Introduction to English Grammar

Course - first cycle - 7.5 credits

Overview

Admission requirements

The special prerequisite for this course, besides basic eligibility for university studies, is fieldeligibility 6: English B.

For Swedish Upper Secondary Grades merit rating will be calculated according to Områdesbehörighet 6/A6

Selection:

credits 32% final grades 34% national university aptitude test 34%

Description

Introduction to English Grammar will provide you with a basic understanding of the workings of English grammar. You will gain this understanding through the study and analysis of the structure of English sentences. This explicit knowledge of the rules of language use will enable you to analyze and improve your own writing in English.

Syllabus

For students autumn 2014, spring 2014, spring 2013, autumn 2012

Course Code:
EN221L revision 1
Level of specialisation
G1N
Main fields of study:
English
Language:
English
Date of establishment:
09 February 2012
Date of ratification:
28 February 2012
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Culture and Society
Enforcement date:
01 September 2012
Replaces Syllabus ratified:
09 May 2011

Advancement in relation to the degree requirements

The course can normally be included as part of a general degree at undergraduate level.

Entry requirements

The special prerequisite for this course, besides basic eligibility for university studies, is fieldeligibility 6: English B.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding
After finishing the module, the student:
  • knows the terminology of grammatical analysis;
  • has some understanding of the basic concepts related to the study of language in general;
  • understands that producing language is always a matter of selecting from a number of options, and
  • can show knowledge of Malmö University’s perspectives: environment, gender, and migration and ethnicity.
Skills and ability
After finishing the module, the student:
  • can perform basic grammatical analysis of English sentences;
  • can proofread English texts for “correctness”;
  • can discern and describe some syntactic features of various registers and media;
  • demonstrates ability to work to agreed timetables, manage workloads, and meet deadlines, and
  • can apply knowledge of Malmö University’s perspectives to issues pertaining to the English language.
Critical skills and approach
After finishing the module, the student:
  • has some sense of why some language is considered “correct”, and is bestowed with prestige, sometimes fairly arbitrarily.

Assessments

Introduction to English Grammar) is examined by one graded paper, one graded exam, and obligatory peer-graded hand-in grammar exercises.
Students who do not pass the regular course exams have the minimum of two re-sit opportunities. Re-sits follow the same form as the original exams, apart from re-sits for group work, which take the form of individual written assignments.

Course content

Introduction to English Grammar is an introduction to language study in general and the study of English grammar in particular. The course focuses on formal and functional aspects of English grammar and the analytical tools for describing these.

Learning activities

Learning activities are lectures, seminars, self-study and peer review work.

Grading system

Excellent (A), Very Good (B), Good (C), Satisfactory (D), Pass (E) or Fail (U).

Course literature and other teaching materials

Hopper, P., & Hudson J. (In preparation.) English Grammar. Will be published on the homepage for the course.
Trask, R. L. 1999. Language: The Basics. London: Routledge. ISBN 0415340195
Recommended supplementary literature:
Crystal, D. 2004. Rediscover Grammar. 3rd edition. Harlow: Pearson Education. ISBN 0582848628

Course evaluation

All students are offered an opportunity to give oral and written feedback at the end of the course. A summary of the results will be made available in the school's web-pages.
Student participation takes place through the course council.

Contact

Further information


The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department Department of Language and Linguistics.