second cycle 60 credits

Communication for Development: Advancement, Specialization and Master's (Two year) Degree Project

Summary

Admission requirements

60 credits on advanced level in Communication for Development + English B.

Selection:

credits 100%

Syllabus

Syllabus for students autumn 2017

Course Code:
KD628A revision 1
Level of specialisation
A2E
Main fields of study:
Communication for Development
Language:
English
Date of ratification:
22 February 2017
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Culture and Society
Enforcement date:
28 August 2017

Entry requirements

60 credits on advanced level in Communication for Development + English B.

Specialisation and progression relative to the degree regulations

The course is mandatory for a two-year Master of Arts with a major in Communication for Development (120 credits).

Purpose

Advances in Social Action, Planning and Evaluation (15 credits)
This course aims to enhance skills and deepen knowledge around the use of strategic media and communication interventions used in international development cooperation. A variety of Communication for Development theories and methods are explored and students have the opportunity to independently plan, implement and evaluate a Communication for Development intervention.

Specialization (15 credits)
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an opportunity to strengthen and deepen his/her individual academic and professional profile in the field of Communication for Development through the intensive study of relevant readings. Other purposes are to develop the necessary skills for (a) identifying fields of expertise and (b) collecting, summarizing, analyzing, and presenting substantial materials for non-specialists

Production Project (30 credits)
This course aims to develop and apply the theoretical and practical skills and knowledge previously acquired in Communication for Development to create an original production in this field. The intention is to provide the student with a tangible proof of his or her craftsmanship and production skills, which can be used in career advancement.

Contents

Advances in Social Action, Planning and Evaluation (15 credits) The course has two modules; Communicating and Planning Social Action (7.5 credits) and Evaluating Social Action (7.5 credits).

Specialization (15 credits)
The course consists of a specialization in a particular thematic, regional, or demographic subfield of Communication for Development.

Production Project (30 credits) The entire course consists of a production project. This involves creating an original Communication for Development production, event, or intervention, which could include anything from a book chapter, a communication initiative or a radio programme, to a short film, public performance event, or website.

Learning outcomes

Advances in Social Action, Planning and Evaluation (15 credits)
After having completed the course the student will
A1. Be familiar with various social and behaviour change models and their use in development interventions.

A2. Understand the subsequent stages that constitute communication interventions aimed at social action or sustainable development: design and planning a strategy as well as monitoring and evaluating an intervention.

A3. Have acquired a critical understanding of development project planning from a variety of perspectives including the role of locally and culturally-grounded insights, and data, and participatory engagement, and decision-making.

A4. The ability to independently design and carry out a communication intervention aiming at social change and development including engaging in formative research, choosing change theories and models, engaging with communities, stakeholders and target audiences, designing and implementing a plan, developing potential indicators and reporting.

A5. To be able to critically reflect upon the complexity of using communication for transformative action, social change and sustainable development, including the ability to reflect critically on their own roll in these processes.

Specialization (15 credits)

After having completed the course the student will:
B1. Have acquired specialized knowledge on, and understanding of, a thematically, geographically, or demographically defined subfield of Communication for Development.
B2. Understand the process of individual specialization.
B3. Understand the preconditions and challenges of expert knowledge.
B4. Be able to perform tasks necessary for acquiring expert knowledge.
B5. Be able to work on creating his/her individual academic and professional profile.
B6. Be able to present rich and complex data and materials to non-specialists.
B7. Appreciate the limits of specialized knowledge.
B8. Assume a critical approach towards knowledge production in general and the production of expert knowledge in particular.

Production Project (30 credits)
After having completed the course the student will:
C1. Understand the process involved in creating an original Communication for Development production by applying previously acquired knowledge and understanding.
C2. Understand the dynamic connection between theoretical and practical aspects of the creative process.
C3. Understand the applicability of a production in the field of Communication for Development beyond the educational context.
C4. Be able to apply theoretical and practical skills and abilities to professional production in Communication for Development.
C5. Be able to independently plan, create and assess an original production in the field of Communication for Development.
C6. Possess the necessary methodological skills to both create and analyse production in the field of Communication for Development.
C7. Appreciate the limits of her/his acquired knowledge and skills, as well as her/his need and potential for further learning.
C8. Have the capacity to critically reflect on the field of Communication for Development in its entirety and on its historical and global context.
C9. Critically review the production project as a process

Learning activities

Advances in Social Action, Planning and Evaluation (15 credits)
The course uses a 'convergence pedagogy' which combines online teaching and resources with intensive two day in situ seminars that students are expected to attend in person. All teaching is video streamed using online tools so that even students that cannot attend seminars in person can participate online. Course work will be a combination of individual assignments and group work projects. Peer review and collaboration between students is an important learning activity through out the course.

Specialization (15 credits)
The course is student-driven. It uses a ‘convergence pedagogy', which combines live online teaching and resources with intensive in situ seminars and workshops that students are expected to attend in person. All teaching is streamed using online tools so that even students that cannot attend seminars in person can participate online.

Production Project (30 credits)
The course uses a ‘convergence pedagogy', which combines live online teaching and resources with intensive in situ seminars and workshops that students are expected to attend in person. All teaching is streamed using online tools so that even students that cannot attend seminars in person can participate online.

Assessments

Advances in Social Action, Planning and Evaluation (15 credits)
Learning outcomes A1 and A3 are assessed through a group work assignment, and individual literature review. Both assignments require students to analyse, contrast and compare different types of strategic communication initiative (3 credits).

Learning outcomes A2 and A4 are assessed through the planning and implementation (either individually or in pairs) of a simpler communication intervention (4.5 credits).

Learning outcomes A3, A4 and A5 are assessed through the evaluation, individually and as a group, of the student's own and other group members work (4.5 credits).

Learning outcome 5 is assessed through the completion of an individual diary or field journal documenting and reflecting critically over the learning process (3 credits).

Specialization (15 credits)
The course is examined through two individual assignments. The first assignment consists of preparing and presenting an annotated bibliography for the chosen field of specialization. The second assignment is to write, submit, and present a user-friendly overview of the chosen field of specialization that is understandable for non-specialists.

Production Project (30 credits)
The three project stages are assessed separately:

  1. The first stage is the planning phase, which is assessed on the basis of a project plan (7.5 credits).
  2. The second stage involves acquiring the methodological skills to create the production chosen by the student, as well as the initial creative phase of the project. This stage is assessed with a process paper (7.5 credits).
  3. The third stage consists of finalising and presenting the production and submitting an academic report in which the student reflects on the production process (15 credits).

Grading system

Excellent (A), Very Good (B), Good (C), Satisfactory (D), Pass (E) or Fail (U).

Course literature and other teaching materials


Advances in Social Action, Planning and Evaluation (15 credits)
Enghel, Florencia & Karin Wilkins (eds.) (2012). Communication, Media and Development : Problems and Perspectives. Nordicom Review vol. 33/Glocal Times, issue 17/18
Hemer, Oscar and Thomas Tufte (eds.) (2005) Media and Glocal Change. Rethinking Communication for Development. Buenos Aires, Göteborg:
CLACSO/Nordicom http://biblioteca.clacso.edu.ar/ar/libros/edicion/media/media.html

Lennie, June. & Tacchi, Jo. (2013). Evaluating communication for development: a framework for social change. New York: Routledge
Mefalopulos, Paulo and Thomas Tufte (2009). Participatory Communication. A practical guide.

World Bank Working Paper 170. The World Bank
Patton, M. Q. (2012) Essentials of utilisation-focused evaluation. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage
Quarry, Wendy & Ramírez, Ricardo (2009) Communication for another development: listening before telling. London: Zed Books
Ramirez, Ricardo & Dal Brodhead (2013). Utilization Focused Evaluation : A primer for evaluators. Penang: Southbound
Available online http:evaluationinpractice.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/ufeenglishprimer.pdf
Wilkins, Karin. Tufte, Thomas and Obregon, Rafael (eds.) (2014) The Handbook of Development Communication and Social Change. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwel
Specifically
Chapter 4, Wilkins, Karin (2014) Advocacy Communication pp. 58 - 71
Chapter 10, Wasiboard, Silvo (2014) The Strategic Politics of Participatory Communication pp.147 - 167
Chapter 17, McKnee, Neil. Becker-Benton and Bockh, Emily (2014) Social and Behaviour Change Communication pp. 279 – 297
Please note: The Hand Book in Development Communication is available as an online resource through the Malmö University library
Suggested additional and thematic readings will be announced at the beginning of the course

Specialization (15 credits)
The course literature and other teaching materials are selected by the student and approved by the supervisor.
Joint core course literature:
Fink, Arlene: Conducting Research Literature Reviews-From the Internet to Paper (4th Edition), London: Sage, 2014.
Ridley, Diana: The Literature Review-A Step-by-Step Guide for Students (2nd Edition), London: Sage, 2012.

Journal of Development Effectiveness: Special Issue on Systematic Reviews, Vol.4, No.3, 2012.

Mallet, Richard: ‘What works’? Systematic reviews in international development research and policy, London: ODI, 2012, available online at https://www.odi.org/comment/6283-systematic-reviews-international-development-slrc

Production Project (30 credits)

Individual reading lists will be made for each production/intervention in dialogue between student(s) and supervisor.
Suggested joint references are listed below.
ComDev theory and methodology
Hemer, Oscar & Thomas Tufte (eds.) (2016). Voice & Matter: communication, development and the cultural return. Göteborg: Nordicom
Ngomba, Teke & Norbert Wildermuth (eds.) (2016). Methodological reflections on researching communication for development and social change. Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan
Thomas, Pradip N. (ed.) (2015). Beyond the impasse: exploring new thinking in communication for social change. Göteborg: Nordicom Review 36 (special issue)
Methodological readings
Willett, Amanda (2013). Media production: a practical guide to radio & TV. Oxford: Routledge.
Rettberg, Jill Walker (2014). Blogging. Cambridge: Polity.
Morley, David (2007). The Cambridge introduction to creative writing. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Pope, Rob (2005). Creativity: theory, history, practice. Oxfordshire: Routledge.
Other readings (general and specific)
Bolton, Gillie (2010) Reflective practice: writing and professional development. London: Sage.
Pink, Sarah. Horst, Heather, Postill, John, Hjort, Larissa, Lewis, Tanya & Jo Tacchi (2016). Digital ethnography: principles and practice. 1st edition. London: SAGE
Reason, Peter & Bradbury, Hilary (2013) The SAGE handbook of action research. Participative inquiry and practice. London: Sage.
Terras, Melissa, Nyan, Julianne & Vanhoutte, Edward (2013) Defining digital humanities. A reader. Farnham: Ashgate.
Wulff, Helena (ed.) (2016). The anthropologist as writer: genres and contexts in the twenty-first century//. New York: Berghahn

Course evaluation

The University provides students who participate in or who have completed a course with the opportunity to make known their experiences and viewpoints with regards to  
the course by completing a course evaluation administered by the University. The University will compile and summarize the results of course evaluations as well as informing participants of the results and any decisions relating to measures initiated in response to the course evaluations. The results will be made available to the students (HF 1:14).

Contact

The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department School of Arts and Communication.

Further information

Åsa Ulemark, Student Services Assistant
Phone: 040-66 57212

Application

28 August 2017 - 03 June 2018 Flexible 100% Distance (Malmö) Application code: mah-72627

National application round

Tuition fees

for non-EU students only

First instalment: 102000 SEK
Full tuition Fee: 102000 SEK

Open for late application

Apply
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