Human Rights

Programme - first cycle - 180 credits

Overview

Admission requirements

General entry requirements + English B.

For Swedish Upper Secondary Grades merit rating will be calculated according to Områdesbehörighet 6/A6

Selection:

final grades 66% national university aptitude test 34%

Matilda Andersson is studying Human Rights at Malmö University"The programme has provided me with a greater understanding of social development. As a student, I have gone from being a spectator of society to better understand human rights and their relation to societal development." – Matilda Andersson, student

Description

This programme provides you with an understanding and knowledge of what constitutes human rights, how they are utilised and how the development of human rights is a result of world transformation. Human rights imply that all people are born free, are of equal value and have equal rights. But what rights prevail, how are they monitored and what happens when they are violated?
After graduation students will be able to work with legal, political or ethical issues within the sphere of human rights. Students can also continue on to master's studies.

Content

Why study Human Rights?

The issue of human rights is constantly relevant. By studying them, their importance, history and implementation, we are provided with the opportunity to fully understand current events in the public debate, ranging from migration and children's rights to global crime and criminal law. In this programme, we take a look at the local and international role of human rights, and their role in public authorities, organisations and businesses. The role of human rights in democracies and oppressive regimes will also be studied.

Human Rights at Malmö University

Student at the Orkanen LibraryThis three-year bachelor's programme provides you with an in-depth knowledge of human rights and how they are applied and affected by the world we live in. This is a multi-disciplinary programme, which focuses on viewing human rights in three perspectives:

Law

What role doles human rights play in international law? How have these rights changed from common held moral norms to law, and what has happened as a result?  

Politics

How are international communities and governments addressing these rights? We look at this from a sociological and political perspective.

Philosophy

What questions are raised by these rights? Who decides which rights predominate, and what is the significance of having rights?

During the programme students can choose to do an internship, study abroad or take elective courses. This provides you with the opportunity to deepen your knowledge and get practical experience in human rights work, as well as the chance to develop relationships and network with people and organisations in the industry.

What career will you be prepared for?

The diversity of the programme combined with its multidisciplinary focus provides you with competences attractive in numerous sectors in a constantly growing labour market. You will be able to work with legal, political or ethical issues, as well as to continue at a master’s level.

Future employers might include private sector businesses, local and international organisations and agencies as well as national authorities and government organisations.

Studying Human Rights gives you a platform for a career in organisations such as the UN, Amnesty International and the European Union.

Interviews

Edoardo wants to work with international law 

For Edoardo Iacobelli, studying human rights seemed to be a perfect way of making a profession out of his interest for international issues. When the time came to pick a bachelor’s programme, Malmö University seemed to be the perfect fit, located in a genuinely multicultural city.

Seeing new perspectives

“Studying Human Rights is fascinating; we do get the full spectrum of it all. The political and legal, aswell as the more philosophical perspective. I have always been very interested in social change, and I want to work with something that has a demonstrable effect on people’s lives, this programme has opened doors for me to do that.

Portrait of Edoardo

“My ambition has always been to work with politics, and I wanted to study something versatile and substantial, and that’s why I chose this programme. Once I started, it was the legal aspect that caught my interest, and my goal now is to work with international law in combination with my degree in Human Rights. I find that this programme encourages us to work with different spheres
within human rights, not just politics.”

Benefits of choosing Malmö

Studying human rights means you have to put in the hours, but it’s not all lectures and homework. One of the advantages of studying in Malmö is that you are very close to the issues at hand. Since moving here, Edoardo has become Chairman of Amnesty’s Malmö section.

“Malmö is a big activist city and offers a spectrum of organisations to get involved in if you are passionate about human rights. It’s a great place to meet like-minded people interested in humanitarian issues who want to make a difference.”

The programme consists primarily of lectures, seminars and group work, all led by great teachers, says Edoardo:

“If I could give some advice for prospective students it would be to pick the brains of the teachers, soak up as much information as you can. The professors are great, and lecturers are never afraid to have discussions in class. You can tell it’s not just about one-way communication.“

An education that inspires you to take part in society

For Matilda Andersson, moving to a new town and studying full time was not an easy choice to make. “I think a lot of students are hesitant, it’s a bit of a gamble. What I would like to say to them is: just go for it! You won’t regret it for a second.”

Matilda Andersson is studying Human Rights at Malmö UniversityChoosing Human Rights

Not having studied at university before, Matilda was looking for a broad programme that offers specialisation in a variety of fields. She enjoys that the programme in Human Rights provides its students with several perspectives including politics, law and philosophy.

“I have travelled a lot, and that affected my view of society and development and sparked an interest in human rights. The programme has provided me with a greater understanding of social development. As a student, I have gone from being a spectator of society to better understand human rights and
their relation to societal development.

“I felt attracted to the university's profile. It is a modern university, and I had heard great things. You do get a bit extra out of studying human rights in Malmö – international and social issues are discussed very openly here.

“During the autumn 2015 I helped a movement in town working with refugees, and have since realised the number of organisations in the area focusing on humanitarian and international issues. I think that says a lot about this city.”

Open programme structure

Largely consisting of lectures, seminars and group work, the programme also provides students with the opportunity to choose elective courses, or do an internship or exchange studies abroad. Matilda took this opportunity to choose courses focusing on Swedish administrative law.

“it is a broad programme that looks at the concept of human rights from different perspectives. You get the foundation and a deeper perspective on the issues. After that it's up to you what you want to do with it, and I want to work locally.

“Everything the programme touches on relates to major global issues, that’s why you will never regret choosing this programme.”

Syllabus

Syllabus for students admitted autumn 2017

Other semesters:

Programme Code:
SGMRE revision 12
Language:
English
Date of establishment:
02 March 2007
Date of ratification:
27 February 2013
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Culture and Society
Enforcement date:
02 September 2013
Replaces Syllabus ratified:
07 November 2012

Entry requirements

General entry requirements + English B.

Organisation

Human rights is a concept that is used all the more frequently in society nowadays, and is applicable to cooperation at both national and international levels. For example, human rights are raised with regards to the pursuits and operational regulations of national and international public authorities, organisations and business concerns. The respect for and the promotion of human rights have become mainstays for the protection of rights and individual security in democracies and stable communities governed by law.

The purpose of the Bachelor’s Programme in Human Rights is to provide students with an understanding and knowledge of what constitutes human rights, how they are utilised, and how development in this field of study is a consequence of transformation in the world.

The programme is comprised of six semesters of study and leads to a bachelor’s degree in Human Rights. Term one consists of Human Rights I and is organised in terms of an introduction to the multidisciplinary approach to human rights characteristic of the programme, i. e. as it relates to law, politics and philosophy. Human Rights I also include a project work in groups. Term two consists of studies in Human rights II, which is an advancement of human rights I. The multidisciplinary perspectives from human rights I is studied and analysed from an in-depth approach with focus on regional legal human rights systems, universalism and social theory. Human rights II is finalized by a project work including method. Term three and four consist of elective studies, which makes it possible for the student to enroll in various exchange programmes, or combine studies with an internship (one term), as long as the programme coordinator deems it to be relevant to the study programme. Term five consists of specialized courses within a range of multidisciplinary areas in law, politics, philosophy and religion. for example:
  • Children’s best interests in theory and practice (MR221L)
  • Forced migration in a human rights perspective 7,5 credits (MR220L)
  • Global Justice (MR226L)
  • International crimes and criminal law (MR222L)
  • The Right to Life and Modern Conceptions of Life (MR225L) 7,5 credits

The last term, the sixth semester, consists of Human Rights III, which includes a theory and method course and is finalized with a BA essay comprising 15 credits.

Content

Courses

For programme with start Autumn 2017:
Autumn 2017 - Semester 1
Spring 2018 - Semester 2
Autumn 2018 - Semester 3
  • -
Spring 2019 - Semester 4
  • -
Autumn 2019 - Semester 5
  • -
Spring 2020 - Semester 6

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding

A graduate of the Bachelor’s Programme in Human Rights:
- understands how human rights are regulated in national legislation and international law, and comprehends the relationship between these two systems;

- has a knowledge and an understanding of the political dimensions of the development and application of human rights;

- has a knowledge and a fundamental understanding of the structure of human rights theories and inducement, in addition to the questions and issues the theories are designed to analyse;

- has a knowledge of human rights in an international political context.

Applying knowledge and understanding

A graduate of the Bachelor’s Programme in Human Rights:
- can identify, formulate and resolve problems related to human rights from judicial, political and philosophical perspectives;

- possesses the skills to apply theories of human rights needed to analyse and evaluate factual conditions and phenomena;

- has the ability to write academic texts, and can give an account of human rights related projects orally and in writing;

- accomplishes tasks individually or collectively within agreed timetables;

- can use his or her competence as a basis for a career or further research in relevant areas and

Making judgements and developing communication skills

A graduate of the Bachelor’s Programme in Human Rights:
- has the ability to independently analyse and interpret the development of human rights from a multidisciplinary perspective;

- has the ability to make rational judgements drawing on various methodological aspects within the field of human rights and

- can evaluate independently and reflect critically on questions concerning human rights and the role they play in society today.

Degree

Bachelor's Degree.
Bachelor of Arts with a major in Human Rights.

Contact

Further information

Anna-Karin Holm, Student Services Assistant
Phone: 040-66 57317
E-mail: anna-karin.holm@mah.se

Malin Isaksson, Programme Coordinator
Phone: 040-66 57282
E-mail: malin.isaksson@mah.se


The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department Department of Global Political Studies.