English I

Course - first cycle - 1-30 credits

Syllabus for students autumn 2014, spring 2014, autumn 2013

Course Code:
EN101A revision 3
Level of specialisation
G1N
Main fields of study:
English
Language:
English
Date of establishment:
09 February 2012
Date of ratification:
01 July 2013
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Culture and Society
Enforcement date:
02 September 2013
Replaces Syllabus ratified:
07 December 2012

Advancement in relation to the degree requirements

The course constitutes the level 1-30 within the main subject of English.

Entry requirements

General entry requirements + English B.

Learning outcomes

Reading and Responding
Knowledge and understanding
After finishing the module, the student:

  • has knowledge of some of the major literary genres;
  • has a basic understanding of literary form, and
  • recognises and can employ terminology employed in the analysis fictional prose.

Skills and ability
After finishing the module, the student:
  • can perform basic analyses of fictional prose;
  • is able to read literary texts closely with a particular attention to thematic questions;
  • demonstrates ability to work to agreed timetables, manage workloads, and meet deadlines.

Critical skills and approach
After finishing the module, the student:
  • demonstrates awareness of basic critical methodology in the analysis of literature in English, and
  • is critically aware of his or her own cultural standpoint in literary analysis.

Academic Writing and Rhetoric
After finishing the module, the student:
  • understands the basic elements of rhetoric, including the interaction of purpose, writer, audience, content, form and meaning;
  • understands writing as a process that includes prewriting, drafting, writing, rewriting, peer review and editing;
  • can use writing and reading for inquiry, learning, thinking and communication;
  • can control such features as grammar punctuation and spelling;
  • can write a well-crafted paper and give a well-crafted oral presentation in an accent that can be understood by the majority of English speakers;
  • can evaluate learner texts or other texts on different levels in terms of basic rhetorical elements, and
  • can demonstrate the ability to work to agreed timetables, manage workloads and meet deadlines.

Introduction to English Grammar
Knowledge and understanding
After finishing the module, the student:
  • knows the terminology of grammatical analysis;
  • has some understanding of the relationship between syntax and the other linguistic disciplines, semantics and pragmatics, and
  • understands that producing language is always a matter of selecting from a number of options.

Skills and ability
After finishing the module, the student:
  • can perform basic grammatical analysis of English sentences;
  • can proofread English texts for “correctness”;
  • can discern and describe some syntactic features of various registers and media, and
  • demonstrates ability to work to agreed timetables, manage workloads, and meet deadlines.

Critical skills and approach
After finishing the module, the student:
  • has some sense of why some language is considered “correct”, and is bestowed with prestige, sometimes fairly arbitrarily.

Phonetics
Knowledge and understanding
After finishing the module, the student:
  • understands the basic principles of phonetics and phonology, in general but also in particular in relation to English;
  • will be able to recognize and use standard descriptive terminology for phonetics and English phonology;
  • will be able to identify and describe some non-standard varieties of spoken English;
  • will understand and be able to use the standard terminology employed to describe metre and other sound patterning in English poetry (rhyme, assonance etc), and
  • knows the International Phonetic Alphabet.

Skills and ability
After finishing the module, the student:
  • can analyse the structure of English phonology;
  • can speak English in an accent that is understood by a majority of English speakers in Europe, and
  • demonstrates ability to work to agreed timetables, manage workloads, and meet deadlines.

Critical skills and approach
After finishing the module, the student:
  • is able to reflect critically on the role of English pronunciation in contemporary society from perspectives of gender, class, education, group membership etc;
  • can think critically about the way any accent of English - including his or her own - facilitates or impedes communication, and inevitably arouses prejudice either positive or negative, and
  • understands the notion of significant difference, central to any understanding of phonology, and central too to any understanding of the notion of shared culture. Understands too that what is “natural” in the production of one language may not be in another.

Assessments

Reading and Responding is examined by two exams and a portfolio. Students must receive a passing grade in all examination elements to pass the course.

Academic Writing and Rhetoric is examined by two graded written assignments, an oral presentation (done in groups), and a portfolio containing ungraded assignments.

Introduction to English Grammar is examined by one graded paper, one graded exam, and a portfolio of peer-graded grammar exercises.

Phonetics is examined by an exam and a presentation/paper done in pairs.


Students who do not pass the regular course exams have the minimum of two re-sit opportunities. Re-sits follow the same form as the original exams, apart from re-sits for group work, which take the form of individual written and oral assignments.

Course content

English I consists of four 7.5 credit modules:

  1. Reading and Responding (7.5 credits)
  2. Academic Writing and Rhetoric (7.5 credits)
  3. Introduction to English Grammar (7.5 credicts)
  4. Phonetics (7.5 credits)

Reading and Responding is an introduction to the analysis of literature in English, literature both canonical and contemporary.

Academic Writing and Rhetoric focuses on the formal aspects of written and oral production: the general practices of both social science and humanities essays, and practical skills for giving oral presentations.

Introduction to English Grammar is an introduction to language study in general and the study of English grammar in particular. The course focuses on formal and functional aspects of English grammar and the analytical tools for describing these.

Phonetics is an introduction to phonetics and phonology, applied especially to English but with application to any language, producing not only increased awareness of the sound of various accents, but also introducing students to the seminal importance of the notion of difference in the study of language.

Learning activities

Learning activities are lectures, seminars, self-study, peer review work and oral presentations.

Grading system

Excellent (A), Very Good (B), Good (C), Satisfactory (D), Pass (E) or Fail (U).

Course literature and other teaching materials

Reading and Responding (7.5 credits)
Coetzee, J. M. Disgrace. London: Vintage, 2000. ISBN: 0099284820

Montgomery, Martin, et al . Ways of Reading. Routledge; 4 edition
# ISBN-10: 0415677475
# ISBN-13: 978-0415677479

Oates, Joyce Carol (ed.): The Oxford Book of American Short Stories. 1992 Oxford University Press ISBN10: 0195092627
(or Oates, Joyce Carol (ed.): The Oxford Book of American Short Stories. 1992 Oxford University Press, 2nd edition ISBN 978-0-19-974439-8)

Further material will be supplied online via It's Learning.

Academic Writing and Rhetoric (7.5 credits)
Details concerning the course literature (digital platform and E-book )will be given at the introductory meeting.

Additional photocopied material or electronic publications may be introduced by the teacher but no more than 50 pages.

Introduction to Grammar (7.5 credicts)
Hopper, P., & Hudson J. (In preparation.) English Grammar Will be published on the homepage for the course.

Trask, R. L. 1999. Language: The Basics. London: Routledge. ISBN 0415340195

Recommended supplementary literature://
Crystal, D. 2004.
Rediscover Grammar. 3rd edition. Harlow: Pearson Education. ISBN 0582848628

Phonetics (7.5 credits)
Rogerson-Revell, Pamela.
English Phonology and Pronunciation Teaching.// Continuum, 2011. ISBN 978-0-8264-2403-7

Course evaluation

All students are offered an opportunity to give oral and written feedback at the end of the course. A summary of the results will be made available in the school's web-pages.

Student participation takes place through the course council.