English II

Summary

Culture, Narrative and Representation develops a theoretical understanding of narrative, and gives students tools with which to analyse a variety of narratives. Introduction to the Thoery of Literature In the course the students learn how different theories of literature have emerged as responses to particular issues in literature, in other theories of literature, and outside literature. The students learn to frame literary issues using concepts in literary theory. Semantics develops students' knowledge of central concepts within semantics primarily but also to a certain extent within pragmatics, paired with the skill to use these concepts to analyze English words and sentences.Academic Writing and Rhetoric II develops students’ academic writing abilities so that they will have authentic, relevant, cognitive and practical skills; it also engages students in the production and meta-cognitive analysis of effective

Admission requirements

Prerequisite courses for this course are: Passed courses: EN101A-English I or EN101E-English I.

Selection:

credits 60% final grades 20% national university aptitude test 20%

Syllabus

Syllabus for students spring 2018, spring 2017

Course Code:
EN102C revision 1.1
Level of specialisation
G1F
Main fields of study:
English
Language:
English
Date of ratification:
14 December 2016
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Culture and Society
Enforcement date:
16 January 2017
Replaces Syllabus ratified:
11 March 2016

Entry requirements

Prerequisite courses for this course are: Passed courses: EN101A-English I or EN101E-English I.

Specialisation and progression relative to the degree regulations

The course constitutes the level 31-60 within the main subject of English.

Purpose

Culture, Narrative and Representation develops a theoretical understanding of narrative, and gives students tools with which to analyse a variety of narratives. In the module Introduction to the Theory of Literature the students learn how different theories of literature have emerged as responses to particular issues in literature, in other theories of literature, and outside literature. The students learn to frame literary issues using concepts in literary theory.Semantics develops students' knowledge of central concepts within semantics primarily but also to a certain extent within pragmatics, paired with the skill to use these concepts to analyze English words and sentences.Academic Writing and Rhetoric II develops students’ academic writing abilities so that they will have authentic, relevant, cognitive and practical skills; it also engages students in the production and meta-cognitive analysis of effective

Contents

English II consists of the following modules:
• Culture, Narrative and Representation, 7.5 credits
• Introduction to the Theory of Literature, 7.5 credits
• Semantics, 7.5 credits
• Academic Writing and Rhetoric II, 7.5 credits
Culture, Narrative and Representation The focus is on both of fictional and non-fictional narratives. Each week, we will explore animportant distinction in narrative theory, such as fabula/sjuzhet, implied reader, narrative closure,representation of the real by analysing literary and non-literary texts.
Introduction to the Theory of Literature During the course the students develop an understanding of different theories of literature, andgives students tools to frame literary issues in theoretically informed ways.
Semantics This course is about meaning in language and thus deals with both the nature of language andthe structure of communication. In more detail, the course deals with how words are related toother words, and how sentences are related to other sentences, by examining relations such assynonymy, antonymy, hyponymy and implication. In this course we will also investigategrammatical and lexical meaning in language, through an investigation of concepts such asaspect and modality.
Academic Writing and Rhetoric II The course is taught through a combination of lectures and seminars, and it approaches criticalthinking, reading and writing as complex and flexible processes for learning as well ascommunicating.

Learning outcomes

Culture, Narrative and Representation (7.5 credits)
After finishing the course, the student:
1) understands some of the most important distinctions in narrative theory and can analyse narratives by using those distinctions;
2) can practise techniques of close reading and reflect on their own ability to produce interpretations; and
3) can seek and evaluate further information within the field of narrative theory.

Introduction to the Theory of Literature(7.5 credits)
After completing this course, the student
1) understands some of the most important distinctions in the theory of literature;
2) can practice techniques of analysis through concepts and reflect on their own ability to produce interpretations, and;
3) can seek and evaluate further information within the field of literary theory.

Semantics (7.5 credits)
After finishing the course, the student:
1) can account for the difference between semantic and pragmatic meanings;
2) can account for the central concepts within semantics;
3) can analyze English words and sentences using semantic methods and concepts;
4) can use correct terminology to describe relevant meaning features of English words and sentences;
5) can demonstrate an awareness of how semantics can contribute to text and discourse analysis; and
6) can seek and evaluate further information within the field of semantics.

Academic Writing and Rhetoric II (7.5 credits)
After finishing the course, the student:
1) will have knowledge of the conventions of usage, specialised vocabulary, format and documentation in his or her field;
2) to actively engage with primary and secondary sources in their field;
3) to produce coherent, effective writing in response to a range of assignments;
4) to use conventions of format and structure appropriate to different rhetorical situations;
5) to integrate their own ideas with those of others;
6) to demonstrate the ability to work to agreed timetables, manage workloads, and meet deadlines.
7) demonstrates confidence in their abilities to communicate effectively in written contexts for a variety of purposes and to diverse audiences.

Learning activities

Learning activities are lectures, seminars, written assignments, oral presentations, exercises, quizzes, self-studies of course literature and independent work on particular topics.

Assessments

Culture, Narrative and Representation
The course is assessed through one oral and one written examination. Learning outcomes 1-3 are examined in both examinations.

Introduction to the Thoery of Literature
The course is examined through one oral exam (2,5 credits) and one written assignment (5 credits). Learning outcomes 1-3 are examined in both examinations.

Semantics
The course is assessed through one written in-class exam and one written assignment. The written exam assesses learning outcomes 1-4 and the written assignment assesses learning outcomes 3-6, in relation to a topic selected by the student.

Academic Writing and Rhetoric II
The course is examined through one written assignment (graded A–U for 3.5 credits) and one graded portfolio (graded A–U for 4 credits). The written assignment assesses learning outcomes 1, 2, and 5; the portfolio assesses learning outcomes 3 and 4; both assess learning outcomes 6 and 7.


The student must receive a passing grade in all examination elements to pass the course. Students who do not pass the regular course exams have the minimum of two re-sit opportunities. Re-sits follow the same form as the original exams, apart from re-sits for group work, which take the form of individual written assignments.

Grading system

Excellent (A), Very Good (B), Good (C), Satisfactory (D), Pass (E) or Fail (U).

Course literature and other teaching materials

Culture, Narrative and Representation
Literature to be decidded. it will be available at least 2 months before the course module starts, i.e. February, 2018.
Introduction to the Theory of Literaure
The Norton Anthology of Theory & Criticism, ed. Vincent B. Leitch et al. (W.W. Norton & Co. 2001)
William Shakespeare, Othello, ed. Edward Pechter (Norton Critical Editions 2017)
Virginia Woolf, Mrs Dalloway, ed. Merry M. Pawlowski (Wordsworth Classics 1996)

Further materials to be made available via Its Learning.

Semantics
Hurford, J. R., Heasley, B., & Smith, M. B. 2007. Semantics: a coursebook. Cambridge University Press.
Additional material may be introduced in the course, but no more than 200 pages.

Academic Writing and Rhetoric II
James, Henry, The Turn of the Screw, 2nd edition Norton Critical Edition, ed. Deborah Esch and Jonathan Warren (New York and London: W.W. Norton & Co., 1999)
Birkenstein, Cathy, and Gerald Graff, They Say/I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing, 3rd edition (New York and London: W.W. Norton & Co., 2014)

Course evaluation

The course is concluded with an individual course evaluation focusing on the goals of the course. A summary of the evaluation is results is made available to the students on the university network/learning platform and is discussed in programme councils or similar forums connected to the course.

Interim rules

In a case when a course is no longer given, or the contents have been changed essentially, the student has the right to two re-examination opportunities during a one-year period according to the course plan valid at the time of registration. The department sets the exam opportunities and it is the student’s responsibility to contact the department to find out how and when re-examinations take place.

Contact

The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department School of Arts and Communication.

Further information

Studentservice, K3 - Malmö högskola,

Application

15 January 2018 - 03 June 2018 Day-time 100% Malmö Application code: mah-82203

National application round

Tuition fees

for non-EU students only

First instalment: 41000 SEK
Full tuition Fee: 41000 SEK

Open for late application

Apply