English III, Literary option

Summary

The aim of English III, Literary option, is for the student to gain in-depth knowledge and skills in the field of literature, through course work in Locating the Field: A Reader and Theory and Narrative Analysis, as well as independent research in the form of a 15-credit bachelor paper in an area of specialisation.

Admission requirements

Basic eligibility for university studies and the higher education courses English I, 30 credits (en101E/A) and English II, 30 credits (EN102E/A/B) or equivalent.

Selection:

credits 60% final grades 20% national university aptitude test 20%

Syllabus

Syllabus for students spring 2020, spring 2019, spring 2018, spring 2017, spring 2016

Course Code:
EN113A revision 2
Level of specialisation
G2E
Main fields of study:
English
Language:
English
Date of ratification:
18 October 2015
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Culture and Society
Enforcement date:
18 January 2016
Replaces Syllabus ratified:
29 August 2013

Entry requirements

Basic eligibility for university studies and the higher education courses English I, 30 credits (en101E/A) and English II, 30 credits (EN102E/A/B) or equivalent.

Specialisation and progression relative to the degree regulations

The course is the literary option of English as a main subject on the level of 61-90 credits. To meet the degree requirements for a bachelor degree in English this course, or the equivalent course option on the same level, must be completed.

Purpose

The aim of English III, Literary option, is for the student to gain in-depth knowledge and skills in the field of literature, through course work in Locating the Field: A Reader and Theory and Narrative Analysis, as well as independent research in the form of a 15-credit bachelor paper in an area of specialisation.

To maintain satisfactory academic progress on the Bachelor’s level, students must be able to locate a research field and ask relevant research questions. Locating the Field: A Reader aims to build student knowledge of the research contexts of their chosen topic. Topics are approved by the board of supervisors. The course work consists of preparing and submitting an annotated bibliography that establishes their chosen research field.

Theory and Narrative Analysis develops an understanding of the constitutive functions of narrative. By analysing a selection of fictional and non-fictional texts, we explore how narrative organises time, space, subjectivity and moral order. The focus is on both fictional and non-fictional narratives.

The Bachelor Research Paper course provides the student with an opportunity to demonstrate the ability to carry out an independent research project in a specific area of literature.

Contents

English III, Literary option, consists of two 7.5 credit modules and a 15-credit research paper.
Module 1: Locating the Field: A Reader (7.5 credits)
Module 2: Theory and Narrative Analysis (7.5 credits)
Module 3: Bachelor Research Paper (15 credits)

Module 1: Locating the Field: A Reader. The course work consists of building an annotated bibliography which is made up of approximately 20 works demonstrating the approach that the student brings to the field. The approach may be organized thematically, conceptually and theoretically, or by genre, period, and region. Primary texts should be cited by date or (where relevant) by specific edition. Secondary works (critical and theoretical texts, including those from fields other than literature), should be cited with full bibliographical references. The annotated bibliography should contain the following entries for each work:
Primary works
1) Field statement: How the work belongs to the chosen research field (Crime Fiction, The Victorian Novel, Orientalism)
Secondary works
1) Topic statement: how the work is relevant to the chosen topic
2) Argument statement: How the work discusses/questions previous knowledge in the field?
3) Research design statement: How the work is intended to be used for analysis

Module 2: Theory and Narrative Analysis. Each week, we will study one constitutive function of narrative. The study will be divided chronologically so that each week we focus on one realistic narrative and one that challenges the realist conventions.

Module 3: Bachelor Research Paper. The course entails independent research into an issue, chosen and formulated in collaboration with the supervisor. The research performed is independent, but the student will receive feedback from a supervisor at various stages during the research process. The course will result in a research paper, defended in an academic seminar.

Learning outcomes

Locating the Field: A Reader
After finishing this course, the student understands the methodological requirements of doing research in their field. The student can formulate relevant research questions and contextualise their topic. They can identify and formulate a research a problem relevant to research within English Studies both orally and in writing. They can also produce a research design for a specific research situation in order to begin their own research. Finally, the students can identify their need for further knowledge within English Studies and take individual responsibility for the development of such knowledge.

Theory and Narrative Analysis
After finishing this course, the student understands the constitutive functions of narratives and can analyse those functions through a close reading of texts in a variety of genres. Furthermore, the student is able to reflect theoretically on the constitutive work of narratives.

Bachelor Research Paper
Knowledge and understanding
After completing this course, the student will be able to
1. demonstrate knowledge and understanding in the field of English Studies, including knowledge of the disciplinary foundation of the field, understanding of applicable methodologies in the field, specialised study in some aspect of the field as well as awareness of current research issues.

Competence and skills
After completing this course, the student will be able to
2.demonstrate the ability to search for, gather, evaluate and critically interpret the relevant information for a formulated problem and also discuss phenomena, issues and situations critically,

3.demonstrate the ability to identify, formulate and solve problems autonomously and to complete tasks within predetermined time frames,

4. demonstrate the ability to present and discuss information, problems and solutions in speech and writing and in dialogue with different audiences, and

5.demonstrate the skills required to work autonomously in the main field of study.

Judgement and approach
After completing this course, the student will be able to
6. demonstrate the ability to make assessments in the main field of study informed by relevant disciplinary, social and ethical issues,
7. demonstrate insight into the role of knowledge in society and the responsibility of the individual for how it is used, and
8. demonstrate the ability to identify the need for further knowledge and ongoing learning.

Learning activities

The language of instruction is English.

Locating the Field: A Reader
The learning activities on this course are self-study, library research, writing of an annotated bibliography and an oral presentation of the bibliography.

Theory and Narrative Analysis
The learning activities on this course are lectures, seminars, self-study of literature including exercises, quizzes, and independent work on a particular topic.

Bachelor Research Paper
The learning activities comprise seminars, self-study of literature, independent work with the bachelor paper, and supervision.

Assessments

Locating the Field: A Reader
The examination consists of an annotated bibliography organized on the basis of the field that students are developing (5 credits)
The field is presented orally in an examining seminar at the end of the course (2,5 credits). Both examinations are graded pass or fail.

A student who has failed an exam is given two more opportunities to be re-examined on the same course content. After this, a student also has the right to be examined on the same course content when the course is run the next time. Exams and re-exams take place as specified in the timetable for the course. It is the student’s responsibility to find out when and how exams and re-exams take place, and to sign up for re-exams when that is required.
Both examinations are graded pass or fail.
Theory and Narrative Analysis
This course is assessed through one written exam.

Bachelor Research Paper
The learning outcomes of the Bachelor Research Paper course are assessed through the bachelor paper (14 credits) and the opposition seminar (1 credit, graded pass or fail)

Grading system

Excellent (A), Very Good (B), Good (C), Satisfactory (D), Pass (E) or Fail (U).

Course literature and other teaching materials


Locating the Field: A Reader
Approximately 20 works of primary and secondary material on a chosen topic agreed upon by the board of supervisors.

Theory and Narrative Analysis
Aczel, Richard. "Understanding as Over-hearing: Towards a Dialogics of Voice." New Literary History 32.3 (2001) 597-617.
Fludernik, Monika. "New Wine in Old Bottles? Voice, Focalization, and New Writing." New Literary History 32.3 (2001) 619-638.
Gibson, Andrew. "'And the Wind Wheezing Through That Organ Once in a While': Voice, Narrative, Film." New Literary History 32.3 (2001) 639-657.
Jahn, Manfred. "Narrative Voice and Agency in Drama: Aspects of a Narratology of Drama." New Literary History 32.3 (2001) 659-679.
Richardson, Brian. "Voice and Narration in Postmodern Drama. New Literary History 32.3 (2001) 681-694.
Jahn, Manfred. "Commentary: The Cognitive Status of Textual Voice." New Literary History 32.3 (2001) 695-697.
Richardson, Brian. "Commentary: Inhuman Voices." New Literary History 32.3 (2001) 699-701.
Aczel, Richard. "Commentary: Throwing Voices! New Literary History 32.3 (2001) 703-705.
Fludernik, Monica. "Commentary: Narrative Voices—Ephemera or Bodied Beings." New Literary History 32.3 (2001) 707-710.
Gibson, Andrew. "Commentary: Silence of the Voice." New Literary History 32.3 (2001) 711-713.

All articles are available at Project Muse.
The course reading list may also include shorter texts used as examples in the study of narrative theory.

Bachelor Research Paper
The student is expected to independently search for, evaluate and use relevant literature for the bachelor paper.

Recommended academic writing guides
Ramage, John D., John C. Bean and June Johnson. The Allyn and Bacon Guide to Writing. 5th ed. New York: Pearson and Longman.

Graff, Gerald and Cathy Birkenstein. 2010. They Say/I Say - The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing.New York: Ww Norton & Co.

The Purdue Online Writing Lab (tillgängligt via owl.english.purdue.edu)

Course evaluation

The university will enable students who are participating in or have completed a course to express their experiences of and views on the course through a course evaluation to be organised by the university. The university will compile the results of the course evaluations and provide information about these and any actions prompted by them. The results will be made available to the students. (HF 1:14)

Interim rules

When a course is no longer given, or when the content has been changed to a large degree, the student will be offered two opportunities, during a one year period, to be examined according to the course plan which was valid at the time of registration.

The exam opportunities are set by the department and it is the student’s responsibility to contact the department to find out how and when the re-examination will take place.

Other Information

The language of instruction is English.

The right to supervision after the term when the student was first registered for the bachelor course cannot be guaranteed.

Contact

The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department School of Arts and Communication.

Further information

Studentservice, K3 - Malmö högskola,

Application

15 January 2018 - 03 June 2018 Day-time 100% Malmö Application code: mah-82692

National application round

Tuition fees

for non-EU students only

First instalment: 41000 SEK
Full tuition Fee: 41000 SEK

Application deadline 16 October

Apply

14 January 2019 - 09 June 2019 Day-time 100% Malmö Application period for this offer starts 17 September 2018.

20 January 2020 - 07 June 2020 Day-time 100% Malmö