Academic Writing and Rhetoric I

Summary

The aim of this course is to teach students to write short academic essays for a variety of audiences and purposes. Students will learn to write clear, concise and coherent university-level papers in standard written English using current academic citation practices.

Admission requirements

General requirements for university studies.

Syllabus

Syllabus for students autumn 2017

Course Code:
EN208L revision 2.2
Level of specialisation
G1N
Main fields of study:
Language and Cultural Studies
Language:
English
Date of ratification:
27 May 2015
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Culture and Society
Enforcement date:
30 August 2015
Replaces Syllabus ratified:
27 May 2015

Entry requirements

General requirements for university studies.

Specialisation and progression relative to the degree regulations

The course can normally be included as a part of a general degree at undergraduate level.

The course content corresponds to parts of Academic Writing and Rhetoric (EN208L) and English I (EN101A).

Purpose

The course focuses on the formal aspects of written production through the general practices of both social science and humanities essays.

Contents

The course focuses on the formal aspects of written production through the general practices of both social science and humanities essays.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding
After finishing the course, the student:

  1. understands the basic elements of rhetoric, including the interaction of purpose, writer, audience, content, form, and meaning
  2. understands writing as a process that includes prewriting, drafting, writing, rewriting, peer review, and editing
Competence and skills
After finishing the course, the student:
3. can use writing and reading for inquiry, learning, thinking, and communication
4. can control such features as grammar, punctuation, and spelling
5. can write a well-crafted paper
6. can evaluate learner texts or other texts on different levels in terms of basic rhetorical elements
Judement and approach
After finishing the course, the student:
7. can demonstrate the ability to work to agreed timetables, manage workloads, and meet deadlines

Learning activities

Learning activities are lectures, seminars, writing assignments, and self-study of course literature.

Assessments

The course is examined through one written assignment (4.5hp, A-U), and a portfolio (3.0hp, U-G). The student must receive a passing grade in all examination elements to pass the course. The written assignment assesses learning outcomes 1, 3, 4, 5, and 7. The portfolio assesses learning outcomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7.
The student must receive a passing grade in all examination elements to pass the course.
Students who do not pass the regular course exams have the minimum of two re-sit opportunities. Re-sits follow the same form as the original exams..

Grading system

Excellent (A), Very Good (B), Good (C), Satisfactory (D), Pass (E) or Fail (U).

Course literature and other teaching materials


Booth, W.C. et al. 2016. The Craft of Research (4th edition). Chicago, London: University of Chicago Press.
Addition material to be made available online.

Course evaluation

Evaluation is an integral part of the course. A final written evaluation based on the learning outcomes is done at the end of the course. The result of the evaluation is summarized and made available in a report to be used as a basis for future courses.

Contact

The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department Language and Linguistics.

Further information

Anita Marttila, Student Services Assistant
Phone: 040-6657345