Education: History and Theories of Education

Summary

Admission requirements

Degree of Bachelor in education, social sciences or the humanities, and the equivalent of Swedish secondary school English 6 or English B.
alternatively
A professional qualification specialising in teaching that comprises 180 credits, of which 15 credits from an independent project, and the equivalent of Swedish secondary school English 6 or English B.

Syllabus

Syllabus for students autumn 2020

Course Code:
ET601E revision 1.1
Swedish name:
Pedagogik: Utbildningshistoria och pedagogiska teorier
Level of specialisation
A1N
Main fields of study:
Education
Language:
English
Date of ratification:
13 December 2019
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Education and Society
Enforcement date:
31 August 2020
Replaces Syllabus ratified:
24 May 2019

Entry requirements

Degree of Bachelor in education, social sciences or the humanities, and the equivalent of Swedish secondary school English 6 or English B.
alternatively
A professional qualification specialising in teaching that comprises 180 credits, of which 15 credits from an independent project, and the equivalent of Swedish secondary school English 6 or English B.

Purpose

The course intends to enable students to develop broad knowledge of the history of ideas and theoretical foundations of various educational aims and teaching forms. Furthermore, students will develop an understanding of recurrent debates and controversies within educational theory and engage with them.

Contents

The course applies the perspective of the history of ideas to address practices in education. A central component of the course content focuses on how educational theories have developed in various cultural contexts, and how related controversies have arisen. In addition, the course critically assesses educational practices and phenomena such as the lecture, the seminar, the textbook, assessments and curricula, from the perspective of the history and theories of education.

Learning outcomes

Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to

  1. apply a historical and contemporary perspective to the presentation and critically review educational theories that form the basis of different aims and forms of education;
  2. analyse bodily, spatial and temporal conditions related to various educational practices;
  3. analyse how historical and contemporary perspectives on education have been received and challenged in a theoretical educational context.

Learning activities

The course is based on regular lectures, seminars and joint study of literature. There will be opportunities for feedback between the students throughout the course.

Assessments

Test 1 (2001): Written exam (Skriftlig examination), 10 credits. This test will examine the intended learning outcomes 1 and 2.
Test 2 (2002): Oral exam (Muntlig examination), 5 credits. This test will examine the intended learning outcome 3.
The course coordinator will provide information about grading criteria at the start of the course.
It must be possible to distinguish between individual performances for all assessments

Grading system

Excellent (A), Very Good (B), Good (C), Satisfactory (D), Pass (E) or Fail (U).

Course literature and other teaching materials

Aristotle (2004). The Nichomachean Ethics. London: Penguin Classics (336 p.)
Dewey, John (1916/1997). Democracy and Education: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Education. New York: The Free Press (360 p.)
Illich, Ivan (1971/1996). Deschooling Society. London: Marion Boyars (116 p.)
Kant, Immanuel (1784/2009). An Answer to the Question: ‘What is Enlightenment?’ London: Penguin Books (121 p.)
Masschelein, Jan (2018). An Educational Cave Story (on animals that go to 'school'). In P. Smeyers (ed.) International Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Dordrecht: Springer (pp. 1185-1200) (15 p.)
Mollenhauer, Klaus (1983/2014). Forgotten Connections: On Culture and Upbringing (trans. and ed. N. Friesen). Abingdon: Routledge (135 p.)
Muir, James R. (2005). Is Our history of educational philosophy mostly wrong? The case of Isocrates, Theory and Research in Education, 3(2), 165-195 (30 p.)
Nietzsche, Friedrich (1874/1997). Schopenhauer as educator. In D. Breazeale (ed.) Untimely Meditation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (pp. 125-194) (70 p.)
Peters, Richard S. (1963). Education as Initiation. London: The University of London Institute of Education (pp. 7-48) (41 p.)
Plato (1963). The allegory of the cave. In Collected Dialogues of Plato. Princeton: University Press (pp. 747-752) (6 p.)
Rousseau, Jean-Jacques (1762/1979). Emile or On Education. New York: Basic Books (501 p.)
Suissa, Judith (2019). Anarchist education. In C. Levy, M. Adams (Eds.) The Palgrave Handbook of Anarchism. Switzerland: Palgrave MacMillan (pp. 511-529) (19 p.)

Course evaluation

Students who participate in or complete a course must be given the opportunity to share their experiences and provide feedback on the course via a course evaluation issued by the University. The University will compile the course evaluations and provide information regarding the results and any measures taken as a result of the course evaluation. Results will be made available to the students. (Higher Education Ordinance 1:14).

Contact

The education is provided by the Faculty of Education and Society at the Childhood, Education and Society.

Further information

Morten Korsgaard, Course Coordinator
Heléne Henriksson, Student Administrator
Phone: 040-665 77 47

Application

31 August 2020 - 08 November 2020 Day-time 100% Malmö This course is offered as part of a program

Tuition fees

for non-EU students only

First instalment: 20000 SEK
Full tuition Fee: 20000 SEK