Peace and Conflict Studies I

Summary

Peace and Conflict Studies deals with questions like, Why do armed conflicts emerge?, How do they affect human beings in various parts of the world?, Which role do the media and different world views play in this context?, and How can conflict resolution and peace be achieved? Peace and Conflict Studies is a multi-disciplinary field of study. It is suitable both for students interested in research and for those who want to work hands-on.

Admission requirements

General entry requirements + Civics A, English B. Or: Civics 1b / 1a1 +1a2.


For Swedish Upper Secondary Grades merit rating will be calculated according to Områdesbehörighet 6/A6

Selection:

final grades 66% national university aptitude test 34%

Syllabus

Syllabus for students autumn 2017, spring 2017, autumn 2016

Course Code:
FK110L revision 3
Level of specialisation
G1N
Main fields of study:
Peace and Conflict Studies
Language:
English
Date of ratification:
13 June 2016
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Culture and Society
Enforcement date:
29 August 2016
Replaces Syllabus ratified:
23 April 2014

Entry requirements

General entry requirements + Civics A, English B. Or: Civics 1b / 1a1 +1a2.

Purpose

The aim of the course is for the students to acquire a basic understanding of Peace and Conflict Studies and its scientific development as a discpline. Students will also be able to apply the key theories and concepts in relation to historical and contemporary conflicts. Furthermore, students should obtain an understanding of the importance of how conflicts and actors are represented.

Contents

The course consists of four modules:
1. The history of conflicts and the idea of peace (7.5 hp)
The first module gives an overview of the history of wars and conflicts as well as the history of ideas related to peace. The module also covers the rise of the contemporary global world order and its consequences.
2. The foundation of Peace and Conflict Studies (7.5 hp)
The second module gives an introduction to the concepts and theories within peace and conflict studies as well as to the development of the discipline. Different experiences of organized violence are addressed.
3. Media and War (7.5 hp)
In the third module interconnections between media and conflicts are addressed. It concerns media representations of conflicts as well as media’s involvement in conflict areas, both as conflict generator and peacemaker.
4. Enemy Images (7.5 hp)
The fourth module concerns what enemy images are, how they can be used to justify war, how they arise, their consequences and how they can be counteracted.

Learning outcomes

The course consists of four modules with the following learning outcomes:

1. The history of conflicts and the idea of peace (7.5 hp)
After completing the module the student will

1. have basic knowledge about the history of ideas on the idea of peace
2. have basic knowledge about the history of warfare
3. have basic knowledge about economic history and its impact on warfare
4. have the ability to read and assimilate academic texts

2. The foundation of Peace and Conflict Studies (7.5 hp)
After completing the module the student will

1. have basic knowledge about the development of peace and conflict studies as a discipline
2. have knowledge about different forms of direct and structural violence
3. be able to explain the basic concepts of peace and conflict studies and be able to apply them

3. Media and War (7.5 hp)
After completing the module the student will

1. have knowledge about and an understanding of the role of media in conflicts
2. have in-depth knowledge about what characterizes peace and war journalism
3. be able to independently analyze journalism and media products
4. be able to use basic academic formalities and academic language

4. Enemy Images (7.5 hp)
After completing the module the student will

1. be able to independently identify and analyze enemy image constructions in different contexts
2. have basic understanding of how enemy images and cultural violence can justify different forms of violence
3. have basic understanding of theories explaining the acceptance of enemy images as well as how enemy images can be counteracted
4. be able to use academic formalities and academic language

Learning activities

The course is designed for full-time study. The teaching in each module is mainly in the form of lectures and seminars. The majority of the student’s workload consists of independent study.
Students are responsible for keeping up the reading and for coming prepared to each class. Students are expected to take their own initiatives to form reading groups.
The course , especially Module 3, is based on the students active participation in discussions .

Assessments

1. The history of conflicts and the idea of peace (7.5 hp)
The students’ performance in the module is assessed by means of a formal exam (7,5 hp).
2. The foundation of Peace and Conflict Studies (7.5 hp)
Learning outcome 1, 2, and 3 are assessed by means of a formal exam (6.5 hp). Learning outcome 3 is also assessed by means of a written and oral group presentation (1 hp, pass is the only grade given).
3. Media and War (7.5 hp)
The students’ performance in the module is assessed by means of a individual take home exam (7,5 hp).
4. Enemy Images (7.5 hp)
Learning outcome 1, 2 and 4 are assessed by means of a take home exam (5 hp). Learning outcome 3 is assessed by means of an oral exam (2.5 hp).

In order to achieve a passing grade on the course in its entirety, the grade of Pass is required for each examination. Students who have achieved a passing grade on a course or part of a course may not be offered a further opportunity to achieve a higher grade.

Grading system

Excellent (A), Very Good (B), Good (C), Satisfactory (D), Pass (E) or Fail (U).

Course literature and other teaching materials


1. The history of conflicts and the idea of peace (7.5 hp)
  • Bauman, Zygmunt (2004) Wasted Lives: Modernity and its Outcasts. Cambridge: Polity (selected parts).
  • Braudel, Fernand (1986) Civilisationer och kapitalism 1400-1800. Bd 2, Marknadens spel. Stockholm: Gidlund (selected parts).
  • Darwin John, (1997) Imperialism and the Victorians: The Dynamics of Imperial Expansion. The English Historical Review 112(447): 614-642.
  • Engels, Frederick (1845/2010) The Condition of the Working Class in England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Gasperini, Alberto (2008) Globalisation, Reconciliation and the Conditions for Conserving Peace. Global Society 22(1): 27-55.
  • Kaplan, Robert (February 1994). The Coming Anarchy. The Atlantic 273(2): 44-77.
  • Morrow, John (2005) History of Political Thought, A Thematic Introduction, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. (selected parts, will also be used during term 2) (410p.)
  • Pratt, Mary Louise (2008) Imperial Eyes: Travel Writing and Transculturation. London: Routledge. (selected parts)
  • Said, Edward (1979/2003). Orientalism. London: Penguin. (selected parts)
  • Scott, James C. (1998) Seeing Like a State: How Certain Schemes to Improve the Human Conditions Have Failed. New Haven: Yale University Press (selected parts).
  • Timberg Craig and Halperin, Daniel (February 27, 2012) Colonialism in Africa helped launch the HIV epidemic a century ago. Washington Post.
  • Thompson E. P. (1971) The Moral Economy of the English Crowd in the Eighteenth Century. Past & Present 50: 76-136.
  • de Tocqueville, Alexis (1840/1997) Om demokratin i Amerika. Stockholm: Atlantis.
  • Vale, Lawrence J. (2008) Architecture, Power, and National Identity. London: Routledge (selected parts).
  • Wallerstein, Immanuel (1974) Rise and Future Demise of the World Capitalist System. Comparative Studies in Society and History, 16(4): 387-415.
  • Williams, Paul D (ed.) (2013) Security Studies, An Introduction, Abingdon: Routledge (selected parts).

2. The foundation of Peace and Conflict Studies (7.5 hp)
  • Appadurai, Arjun (2000) Spectral Housing and Urban Cleansing: Notes on Millennial Mumbai. Public Culture 12(3): 627-651.
  • Aristophanes (411 BC) Lysistrata.
  • Davis, Mike (1990) Fortress LA. City of Quart, New York: Vintage Books.
  • Davis, Mike (2004) Planet of Slums. New Left Review (26): 5-34.
  • Galtung, Johan (1969) Violence, Peace and Peace Research. Journal of Peace Research 21(3): 167-191.
  • Gandy, Matthew (2006). Planning, Anti-Planning and the Infrastructure Crisis Facing Metropolitan Lagos. Urban Studies 43 (2): 371-396.
  • Herron, Jerry. (2007). Detroit: Disaster Deferred, Disaster in Progress. South Atlantic Quarterly 106(4): 663-682.
  • Kaldor, Mary (2012) New and Old Wars (third edition). Cambridge: Polity Press.
  • Leary, John Patrick. (2011). Detroitism. Guernica: A Magazine of Art and Politics 15 January.
  • Marr, Steve (forthcoming). Shrinking, Exploding: Lagos, Detroit and a Reconsideration of World Cities Theory. Antipode.
  • Norton, Richard J. (2003). Feral Cities. Naval War College Review (4): 97-106.
  • Packer, George (2006) Megacity: Decoding the Chaos of Lagos. The New Yorker 13 November.
  • Scheper-Hughes, Nancy and Philip Bourgois (2003) Violence in War and Peace: An Anthology, London: Blackwell Publishers.
  • Simone, Abdou Maliq (2001) On the Worlding of African Cities. African Studies Review 44(2): 15-41.
  • Williams, Paul D. (ed.) (2013) Security Studies, An Introduction, Abingdon: Routledge (selected parts).

150 pages can be added.

In addition students must prepare an oral presentation based on a book (e.g. novel, collection of short stories, autobiography) or a film (e.g. documentary, fiction or the like). A list of works to choose from will be made available at the commencement of the course.

3. Media and War (7.5 hp)
  • Carruthers, Susan L. (2011) The Media at War: Communication and Conflict in the Twentieth Century. Basingstoke: Macmillan; New York: St. Martin’s Press.
  • Galtung, Johan (1990) Cultural Violence. Journal of Peace Research 27(3): 291–305.
  • Hoskins, Andrew och Ben O’Loughlin (2010) War and Media. Cambridge: Polity Press.
  • Lynch, Jake och Annabel McGoldrick (2005) Peace Journalism. Stroud: Hawthorn Press.
  • Thussu, Daya, Kishan and Des Freedman (eds),(2012), Media and Terrorism; Global Perspectives. London:Sage.

50 pages can be added


4. Enemy Images (7.5 hp)
  • Ahnaf, Muhammad I. (2006) Image of the Other as Enemy, Chiang Mai: Silkworm Books.
  • Brewer, Marilynn B. (1996) When Contact is not Enough: Social Identity and Intergroup Cooperation. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 20(3-4): 291-303.
  • Carruthers, Susan L. (2000) The Media at War: Communication and Conflict in the Twentieth Century. Basingstoke: Macmillan; New York: St. Martin's Press (chapter 1).
  • Dovidio, John (ed) (c2010) The SAGE Handbook of Prejudice, Stereotyping and Discrimination. London: SAGE (selected parts).
  • Entman, Robert M. (1993) Framing: Toward Clarification of a Fractured Paradigm Journal of Communication 43(4): 51-58.
  • Entman Robert M. (1994) Representation and Reality in the Portrayal of Blacks on Network Television News. Journalism Quarterly 71(3): 509-520.
  • Galtung, Johan (1990) Cultural Violence. Journal of Peace Research 27(3): 291–305.
  • Harle, Vilho (2000) The Enemy with a Thousand Faces. Westport: Praeger (selected parts).
  • Keen, Sam (2004) Faces of the Enemy, Reflections of the Hostile Imagination (3rd ed). San Francisco: Harper.
  • Lindsey Blanton, Shannon (1996) Images in Conflict, The Case of Ronald Reagan and El Salvador. International Studies Quaterly, 40(1): 23-44.
  • Mania, Eric W. et al. (2009) Intergroup Contact, Implications for Peace Education. In: Handbook of Peace Education. New York: Psychology Press.
  • Murray, Shoon Kathleen and Cowden, Jonathan A. (1999) The Role of ‘Enemy Images’ and Ideology in Elite Belief System. International Studies Quarterly 43(3): 455-481.
  • Ottosen, Rune (1995) Enemy Images and the Journalistic Process. Journal of Peace Research 32(1): 97-112.
  • Pettigrew, Thomas F. (1998) Intergroup Contact Theory. Annual Review of Psychology 49:1: 65-85.
  • Ramasubramian, Srividya (2007). Media-Based Strategies to Reduce Racial Stereotypes Activated by News Stories. Journalism and Mass Communication Quaterly 84(2): 249-264.
  • Snyder, Mark; Tanke, Elizabeth Decker; Berscheid, Ellen (1977) Social Perception and Interpersonal Behavior: On the Self-Fulfilling Nature of Social Stereotypes. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 35(9): 656-666.
  • Steiner, Kristian. (2012). The Image of Islam and Muslims in Swedish Radical Christian Press. Journal of Religion in Europe 5, 192-222.
  • Steiner, Kristian (2014, accepted). Images of Muslims and Islam in Swedish Christian and Secular News Discourse, Media, War and Conflict, X, XX-XX.
  • Worchel, Stephen (1978) Facilitation of Social Interaction Through Deindividuation of the Target. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 36(5): 549-556.
  • Zur, O. (1991) The Love of Hating, The Psychology of Enmity. History of European Ideas 13(4): 345-369.

100 pages can be added.

Course evaluation

The University provides students who participate in or who have completed a course with the opportunity to make known their experiences and viewpoints with regards to the course by completing a course evaluation administered by the University. The University will compile and summarize the results of course evaluations as well as informing participants of the results and any decisions relating to measures initiated in response to the course evaluations. The results will be made available to the students (HF 1:14).

Interim rules

If a course is no longer offered or has undergone major changes, students will be offered two re-take sessions based on the syllabus in force at registration during a period of one year from the date of the implementation of the changes.

Contact

The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department Department of Global Political Studies.

Further information

Kristian Steiner, Course Responsible
Phone: 040-66 57267

Application

28 August 2017 - 14 January 2018 Day-time 100% Malmö

Tuition fees

for non-EU students only

First instalment: 41000 SEK
Full tuition Fee: 41000 SEK