International Migration and Ethnic Relations I

This course is not offered.

Please see http://edu.mau.se/en/ for our current offerings.
If you have questions about this course, please contact the department, see Contact.

 

Summary

This multidisciplinary course is aimed for students interested in globalization, migration, segregation and integration. It provides basic knowledge and skills in the field of International Migration and Ethnic Relations, focusing on two main issues: the reasons for international migration and the results of international migration. Topics covered include immigrant policy, integration and segregation processes, racism, and cultural diversity.

Admission requirements

The special prerequisite for this course, besides basic eligibility for university studies, is fieldeligibility 6: Civics A and English B. Applicants are exempted from the Civics A requirement.

Selection:

credits 20% final grades 40% national university aptitude test 40%

Syllabus

Syllabus for students autumn 2010, spring 2010, autumn 2009, spring 2009

Course Code:
IM101E revision 3.1
Level of specialisation
G1N
Main fields of study:
International Migration and Ethnic Relations
Language:
English
Date of establishment:
02 March 2007
Date of ratification:
08 June 2009
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Culture and Society
Enforcement date:
08 June 2009
Replaces Syllabus ratified:
02 March 2007

Advancement in relation to the degree requirements

The course can normally be included as a part of a general degree at undergradate level.

Entry requirements

The special prerequisite for this course, besides basic eligibility for university studies, is fieldeligibility 6: Civics A and English B. Applicants are exempted from the Civics A requirement.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding
After finishing the course, the student:

  • can show understanding of the structural and cultural complexity within the field of IMER;
  • can show knowledge of key research concepts within IMER;
  • can show knowledge of migration from a comparative historical as well as a national and a global context;
  • can, on the basis of migration processes, survey issues relating to integration and segregation, particularly within the labour and the housing markets;
  • can show a broad-based understanding of concepts such as multiplicity, integration and segregation;
  • can show knowledge of the processes of labour-market integration and housing segregation in urban settings and
  • can show sufficient knowledge to conduct a critical discussion on the subject of different types of group identification;
  • can show knowledge of (a) the concepts of ethnicity and culture, (b) gender theoretical parallels to the field of IMER, and (c) the correlation between religion, culture and ethnicity;
  • can show an understanding of key concepts such as identity, stigmatisation, racism and anti-racism;
  • can show a critical, analytical and methodological approach to media coverage and presentation of concepts such as integration, migration, ethnicity, discrimination, etc. and
  • can show knowledge of Malmö University’s perspectives: environment, gender, and migration and ethnicity
  • can show knowledge of Malmö University’s perspectives: environment, gender, and migration and ethnicity.

Applying knowledge and understanding
After finishing the course, the student:
  • can perform straightforward analyses of social or cultural phenomena arising within the field of IMER;
  • can work on and present an assignment of limited scope, within agreed timetables and
  • can apply knowledge of Malmö University’s perspectives to issues pertaining to the social sciences.

Making judgments and communication skills
After finishing the course, the student:
  • will have begun to acquire a basic critical and scientific approach to theory within the humanities and the social sciences

Assessments

Migration and Politics
Assessment of the first sub-module is carried out by means of an obligatory seminar assignment (conducted in groups) and a two-part examination. The first part of this examination is a supervised test without access to course literature, while the second part consists of an assessed home assignment.

Economy and Social Strutures
Assessment in the other sub-module is through supervised examinations.

Identity and Community + Identity, Media and Racism
Evaluation is carried out by means of assessed home assignments.

To achieve a pass mark for the course, the student must pass all modules.

Re-sit examinations
Students who do not pass the regular course exams have the minimum of two re-sit opportunities. Re-sits follow the same form as the original exams, apart from re-sits for group work, which take the form of individual written and oral assignments.

Course content

The course consists of four modules:

  1. Migration and Politics (7,5 credits)
  2. Economy and Social Structures (7,5 credits)
  3. Identity and Community (7,5 credits)
  4. Identity, Media and Racism (7,5 credits

Learning activities

Learning is achieved through independent revision of course literature in the light of certain questions for study, as well as through group work and lectures. To facilitate their learning, students have access to the university’s computer rooms and library.

Grading system

Fail (U), Pass (G) or Pass with Distinction (VG).

Course literature and other teaching materials

Migration and Politics
Literature://
Castles, Stephen & Mark J Miller (2009) The Age Of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World. New York: Palgrave Macmillan [Fourth ed]”

+ Compendium

Economy and Social Structure
Castles, Stephen & Mark J Miller (2009) The Age Of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World. New York: Palgrave Macmillan [Fourth ed]” Ch. 10.

Swedenberg, Richard, 2003,
Principals of Economic Sociology. Princeton: Princeton University Press. 366s.

+ Compendium

Identity and Community
Literature:
Castles, Stephen & Mark J Miller (2009) The Age Of Migration: International Population Movements in the Modern World. New York: Palgrave Macmillan [Fourth ed]” Ch 11.

Eriksen, Hylland T (2002)
Ethnicity and Nationalism. London: Sterling, Va: Pluto Press.

Hutchinson, John & Smith, Anthony D. (1996)
Ethnicity. Oxford Reader, University press. (200 s.)

McGuire, Meredith (2002)
Religion: The Social Context. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. [Chapter 1–5]

+ Compendium

Other Sources
Canovan, Margret:
Sleeping Dogs, Prowling Cats and Soaring Doves: Three Paradoxes in the Political Theory of Nationhood.

Identity, Media and Racism
Literature://
Goffman, Erving (1990) Stigma: Notes on the Management of spoiled Identity. London: Penguin Books.

Lentin, Alana (2004), //Racism & Anti-Racism in Europe. London, Pluto, Selected parts 1-112

+ Compendium

Course evaluation

All students are offered an opportunity to give oral and written feedback at the end of the course. A summary of the results will be made available on the school’s web-pages. The students are also given a possibility to offer feedback for each module.

Student participation takes place through the course council

Contact

The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department Department of Global Political Studies.

Further information

Despina Tzimoula, Course Coordinator
Phone: 040-6657213