International Migration and Ethnic Relations II

This course is no longer offered, it has been replaced by International Migration and Ethnic Relations II [IM235E].

If you have questions about this course, please contact the department, see Contact.

 

Summary

Admission requirements

Prerequisite courses for this course are: Passed courses: IM101E-International Migration and Ethnic Relations I.

Selection:

Places on the course are guaranteed for all students who fulfill the entry requirements.

Syllabus

Syllabus for students spring 2010, autumn 2009, spring 2009, autumn 2008

Course Code:
IM102E revision 3.1
Level of specialisation
G1F
Main fields of study:
International Migration and Ethnic Relations
Language:
English
Date of establishment:
02 March 2007
Date of ratification:
18 June 2009
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Culture and Society
Enforcement date:
01 September 2009
Replaces Syllabus ratified:
18 June 2008

Advancement in relation to the degree requirements

The course can normally be included as a part of a general degree at undergraduate level.

Entry requirements

Prerequisite courses for this course are: Passed courses: IM101E-International Migration and Ethnic Relations I.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding
After finishing the course, the student can show:

  • in-depth understanding of relevant structural and cultural contexts within the field of IMER;
  • in-depth understanding of key methodological procedures within the field of IMER;
  • in-depth knowledge of key concepts within IMER research;
  • in-depth knowledge of migration from a comparative historical perspective as well as in a national and global context.
  • a broad-spectrum grasp (based on migration processes) of questions relating to integration and segregation, particularly within the housing and labour markets and
  • in-depth knowledge of Malmö University’s perspectives: environment, gender, and migration and ethnicity.

Applying knowledge and understanding
After finishing the course, the student:
  • can work on and present a project of limited scope within an agreed time scale and
  • can present his/her research results in a brief report in which conventional language usage and format are observed;
  • can act as both opponent and respondent in a scientific thesis seminar and
  • can apply knowledge of Malmö University’s perspectives to issues pertaining to sociology.

Making judgments and communication skills
After finishing the course, the student:
  • will have acquired an increased understanding of basic critical and scientific approaches to theory within the humanities and social sciences.

Assessments

Examination of module 1 as well as that of module 2 is carried out by means of a take-home assignment.

The module 3 is assessed by means of a written examination. Students who do not pass the regular course exams have two re-sit opportunities. Re-sits follow the same form as the original exams.

The module 4 is examined by means of a written group project, which is defended at an opposition seminar. Each group is also required to provide the opposition for another project.


In order to pass the course, a student must pass all examinations.

Re-sit examinations
Students who do not pass the regular course exams have the minimum of two re-sit opportunities. Re-sits follow the same form as the original exams, apart from re-sits for group work, which take the form of individual written and oral assignments.

Course content

The course comprimies four modules:
1. Inclusion, Exclusion and Politics
Through the discussion of citizenship, political populism, post-colonial power balances, and the representation of normality and divergence, this section focuses on ways of understanding how inclusion and exclusion are created in society.

2. Migration, Refugee Policy, Economic Integration
This section seeks to deepen understanding of the theoretical perspectives relating to migration and integration into the labour-market. How may immigration control be understood historically and from a European perspective? What national similarities and differences exist? What rhetorical perspectives may be discerned among different actors in the sphere of migration?

3. Methodology
The aim of the module Method is to provide the student with basic knowledge of both qualitative and quantitative procedures. The module begins with lectures on science, focusing on how science is different from other types of knowledge. The issue of establishing boundary lines between qualitative and quantitative research methods is addressed. Students will also be introduced to sampling procedures, and will learn how to collect, analyse and interpret empirical material. They will also carry out group exercises in method.

4. Project Work
The aim of the module Project Work is to complete a scientific project in groups.

Learning activities

Module 1 and 2:
Learning activities are as follows: independent revision of the course literature in the light of specific questions for study, group work and attending lectures. To further facilitate learning, students have access to the university’s computer rooms and library.

Module 3:
Lectures, seminars, exercises, and a group project work. Moreover, students have access to the university’s computer rooms and library.

Module 4:
Learning is achieved by means of group project work. Moreover, students have access to the university’s computer rooms and library.

Grading system

Fail (U), Pass (G) or Pass with Distinction (VG).

Course literature and other teaching materials

Inclusion, Exclusion and Politics
Literature:
Chambers, Iain (ed.), 1996, Post-Colonial Question: Common Skies, Divided Horizons. Florence, KY, USA: Routledge. site.ebrary.com/lib/malmoe/Doc?id=5004139

Hutchinson, J. & Smith, A. D (eds.), 1996, Ethnicity, Oxford University Press.

Lentin, Alana, 2004, Racism & Anti-racism in Europe. London: Pluto. Selected parts 113-320p.

McGuire, Meredith, 2002, Religion: The Social Context. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. [Chapter 7–8]

+ Compendium

Other Sources
Introduction to Postcolonial Studies: www.emory.edu/ENGLISH/Bahri/Intro.html.

Yuval-Davis, Nira (1996) “Women and the biological reproduction of ‘the nation’”. Women’s Studies International Forum; Jan-Apr, Vol. 19 Issue 1/2, pp17, 8p www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=MImg&_imagekey=B6VBD-3VWPKYG-3-2&_cdi=5924&_user=650479&_orig=browse&_coverDate=04%2F30%2F1996&_sk=999809998&view=c&wchp=dGLbVtb-zSkWA&md5=be21ac7e2f847e690f3a9e7ac6455711&ie=/sdarticle.pdf.

Migration, refugee politics and economic integration
Litteratur
Cornelius, Wayne A. and others (eds.) 2004 Controlling Immigration. A Global Perspective. Second edition. Stanford University Press. Stanford, California pp.300

Darity, W. A. & Mason, P. L., 1998. Evidence on Discrimination in Employment: Codes of Color, Codes of GenderThe Journal of Economic Perspectives, Vol. 12, No 2. Available online: www.jstor.org/stable/pdfplus/2646962.pdf, pp.30

Jan Ekberg & Dan-Olof Rooth, 2003, ”Unemployment and earnings for second generation immigrants-ethnic background and parent composition." Journal of Population Economics no 4: Avaliable online:www.springerlink.com/content/9216nnc16p6pt51q/fulltext.pdf, pp30

Geddes, Andrew, 2003, The Politics of Migration and Immigration in Europe. London: Sage, pp.220.

+ Compendium.

Methodology and Project Work
Literature:
Clanchy, John & Brigid Ballard, 1998, How to Write Essays: A Practical Guide for Students. Melbourne: Longman.

May, Tim, 2001, Social Research Issues, Methods and Process. Buckingham: Open University Press. 250pp.

Okasha, Samir, 2002, Philosphy of Science: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press (144p.)

+ Compendium

Course evaluation

All students are offered an opportunity to give oral or written feedback at the end of the course. A summary of the results will be made available on the school’s web-pages. Students are also given the opportunity to offer oral or written feedback for each module.

Student participation takes place through the course council.

Contact

The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department Department of Global Political Studies.

Further information

Despina Tzimoula, Course Coordinator
Phone: 040-6657213