Introduction to International Migration and Ethnic Relations

This course is not offered.

Please see http://edu.mau.se/en/ for our current offerings.
If you have questions about this course, please contact the department, see Contact.

 

Summary

Admission requirements

The special prerequisites for this course, besides basic eligibility for university studies and are a pass mark from the following upper secondary school courses: English B. Students within programme International Migration and Ethnic Relations (SGIME).

Syllabus

Syllabus for students autumn 2009, autumn 2008

Course Code:
IM208E revision 1.1
Level of specialisation
G1N
Main fields of study:
International Migration and Ethnic Relations
Language:
English
Date of establishment:
02 March 2007
Date of ratification:
18 June 2008
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Culture and Society
Enforcement date:
18 June 2008
Replaces Syllabus ratified:
22 May 2008

Advancement in relation to the degree requirements

The course can normally be included as part of a general degree at undergraduate level.

Entry requirements

The special prerequisites for this course, besides basic eligibility for university studies and are a pass mark from the following upper secondary school courses: English B. Students within programme International Migration and Ethnic Relations (SGIME).

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding
After finishing the course, the student:

  • can show knowledge of the areas of study and scientific theory covered by IMER;
  • can show knowledge of the importance of international migration at a global and a national level;
  • can show knowledge of critical discussion relating to phenomena such as segregation, integration and discrimination;
  • can show understanding of the importance of social identity processes in regard to segregation, integration and discrimination and
  • can show knowledge of Malmö University’s perspectives: environment, gender, and migration and ethnicity.

Applying knowledge and understanding
After finishing the course, the student:
  • can perform a straightforward analysis of a social or cultural phenomenon arising within the field of IMER;
  • can work on and present an explanatory assignment of limited scope, within agreed timetables;
  • can apply knowledge of Malmö University’s perspectives to issues pertaining to the social sciences.

Making judgments and communication skills
After finishing the course, the student:
  • can show insight into the necessity of acquiring a basic critical and scientific approach to theory within the humanities and the social sciences.

Assessments

Introduction to IMER is assessed by means of an oral presentation of a group assignment and by an individual written assignment. The purpose of these assignments is for the student to demonstrate an ability to describe phenomena relating to the field of study covered by IMER. In order to pass the module, the student must complete both assignments successfully.

Re-sit examinations
Students who do not pass the regular course exams have the minimum of two re-sit opportunities. Re-sits follow the same form as the original exams, apart from re-sits for group work, which take the form of individual written and oral assignments.

Course content

Introduction to IMER broaches a range of central issues within the field of IMER, whereby the student is familiarised with phenomena such as segregation, integration and discrimination. In addition, the module provides an introduction to social identity processes, as well as to understanding the importance of international migration on a global and a national level.

Learning activities

Learning activities in Introduction to IMER consist of lectures, group work, oral presentations during seminars, and written assignments. The student reaches an understanding of the subject by independently revising the course literature in the light of certain questions for study, as well as by attending lectures. Working in groups, students subsequently apply the knowledge thus acquired in order to analyse a particular social or cultural situation. To facilitate their learning, students have access to the university’s computer rooms and library. Group work is presented orally before other students and teachers in an obligatory seminar.

Grading system

Fail (U), Pass (G) or Pass with Distinction (VG).

Course literature and other teaching materials

Benn Michaels, Walter, 2006, The Trouble with Diversity: How We Learned to Love Identity and Ignore Inequality. New York: Henry Holt and Company, pp.243.

Koser, Khalid, 2007, International Migration: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 144.

www.migrationinformation.org

+ Compendium

Course evaluation

All students are offered an opportunity to give oral and written feedback at the end of the course. A summary of the results will be made available in the school’s web-pages.

Contact

The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department Department of Global Political Studies.

Further information

Martin Andersson, Student Administrator
Phone: 040-6657805