Problems and Questions in Contemporary IMER Research

Summary

This course offers in-depth knowledge of central issues in international migration and ethnic relations (IMER). It draws on ongoing research at the department and the expertise of the teaching researchers. The aim is both to develop an understanding of state of the art knowledge in the field and to examine how such knowledge is and can be produced. In so doing, the course consistently combines and integrates theoretical and methodological queries.
The course’s underlying pedagogical philosophy is that the generic intellectual skills of critical thinking and independent analysis are best developed in delimited thematic contexts, in which the connection between knowledge about (findings and theories) and knowledge how (methodology) are most visible and open for scrutiny. To this end, the course is focused on key problems and questions in contemporary IMER research, and benefits from the expertise and current research in the department. Apart from offering students in-depth knowledge on a selected set of subjects in the IMER field, it also develops a more profound and general understanding of what it means “to know” something and how such knowledge is produced in the social sciences.

Admission requirements

Bachelor degree in social sciences or humanities + the equivalent of English course B

Syllabus

Syllabus for students autumn 2020, autumn 2019

Course Code:
IM631L revision 1
Swedish name:
Problem och frågeställningar inom aktuell IMER-forskning
Level of specialisation
A1N
Main fields of study:
No main fields
Language:
English
Date of ratification:
14 September 2018
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Culture and Society
Enforcement date:
02 September 2019

Entry requirements

Bachelor degree in social sciences or humanities + the equivalent of English course B

Purpose

This course offers in-depth knowledge of central issues in international migration and ethnic relations (IMER). It draws on ongoing research at the department and the expertise of the teaching researchers. The aim is both to develop an understanding of state of the art knowledge in the field and to examine how such knowledge is and can be produced. In so doing, the course consistently combines and integrates theoretical and methodological queries.
The course’s underlying pedagogical philosophy is that the generic intellectual skills of critical thinking and independent analysis are best developed in delimited thematic contexts, in which the connection between knowledge about (findings and theories) and knowledge how (methodology) are most visible and open for scrutiny. To this end, the course is focused on key problems and questions in contemporary IMER research, and benefits from the expertise and current research in the department. Apart from offering students in-depth knowledge on a selected set of subjects in the IMER field, it also develops a more profound and general understanding of what it means “to know” something and how such knowledge is produced in the social sciences.

Contents

Each module consists of one general and one specific part. The first part introduces the field, key concepts and theories, important findings and main controversies through a series of lectures and seminars with fixed content/readings. The second part consists of individual work on a more specific topic within the wider area, in which students in dialogue with the teacher(s) select and review a particular research field. The reviewed material can be either secondary or primary. Teaching in the second part is organized as a series of supervision workshops where students and teacher(s) meet and discuss selection and assessment of their respective research fields.

Learning outcomes

Upon completion of the course the student is able to:

  1. Critically identify key issues and debates within the IMER field.
  2. Critically consider the multidisciplinary foundation of IMER and of the methodological considerations connected to different subjects and problems.
  3. Collect and systematize appropriate material within a given area of research.
  4. Critically consider methodological choices and identify and discuss theoretical issues in the formulation of research questions and to support the choice of method.
  5. Analyse and evaluate empirical data with regard to relevant scientific social and ethical aspects.
  6. Produce written and oral presentation of research results.

Learning activities

The course is designed to facilitate students’ introduction and participation in the research fields in question. To this end, three types of learning activities are emphasized as spelled out below:

  • Lectures that introduce the field, main problems and questions, findings and controversies through selected readings.
  • Seminars where students discuss research (as secondary or primary material), which is distributed, read and analyzed beforehand.
  • Individual overview and assessment of a selected research subject on the basis of a selected material (secondary or primary) and presented as a research review.

Assessments

The modules examine the students’ performance in the obligatory seminars (Learning Outcomes 1, 2, 5) and the written research review (Learning Outcomes 3, 4, 5, 6). A pass on both accounts is required for passing the course. Students who fail the seminars are required to hand in written make-up assignments. Students who fail the research review are offered the minimum of two re-take opportunities.

Grading system

Excellent (A), Very Good (B), Good (C), Satisfactory (D), Pass (E) or Fail (U).

Course literature and other teaching materials

Course evaluation

The University provides students who participate in or who have completed a course with the opportunity to make known their experiences and viewpoints with regards to the course by completing a course evaluation administered by the University. The University will compile and summarize the results of course evaluations as well as informing participants of the results and any decisions relating to measures initiated in response to the course evaluations. The results will be made available to the students (HF 1:14).

Interim rules

If a course is no longer offered or has undergone major changes, students will be offered a minimum of two re-take sessions based on the syllabus in force at registration during a period of one year from the date of the implementation of the changes.

Contact

The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department Department of Global Political Studies.

Further information

Anne Sofie Roald, Course Coordinator
Phone: 040-6657639

Application

02 September 2019 - 19 January 2020 Day-time 100% Malmö Application period for this offer starts 15 March 2019.

31 August 2020 - 17 January 2021 Day-time 100% Malmö Application period for this offer starts 16 March 2020.