Problems and Questions in Contemporary IMER Research

Summary

This course offers in-depth knowledge of central issues in international migration and ethnic relations (IMER). It draws on ongoing research at the department and the expertise of the teaching researchers. The aim is both to develop an understanding of state of the art knowledge in the field and to examine how such knowledge is and can be produced. In so doing, the course consistently combines and integrates theoretical and methodological queries.
The course’s underlying pedagogical philosophy is that the generic intellectual skills of critical thinking and independent analysis are best developed in delimited thematic contexts, in which the connection between knowledge about (findings and theories) and knowledge how (methodology) are most visible and open for scrutiny. To this end, the course is focused on key problems and questions in contemporary IMER research, and benefits from the expertise and current research in the department. Apart from offering students in-depth knowledge on a selected set of subjects in the IMER field, it also develops a more profound and general understanding of what it means “to know” something and how such knowledge is produced in the social sciences.

Admission requirements

Bachelor degree in social sciences or humanities + the equivalent of English course B

Syllabus

Syllabus for students autumn 2020, autumn 2019

Course Code:
IM631L revision 1
Swedish name:
Problem och frågeställningar inom aktuell IMER-forskning
Level of specialisation
A1N
Main fields of study:
No main fields
Language:
English
Date of ratification:
14 September 2018
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Culture and Society
Enforcement date:
02 September 2019

Entry requirements

Bachelor degree in social sciences or humanities + the equivalent of English course B

Specialisation and progression relative to the degree regulations

The course is not part of a main field of study.

Purpose

This course offers in-depth knowledge of central issues in international migration and ethnic relations (IMER). It draws on ongoing research at the department and the expertise of the teaching researchers. The aim is both to develop an understanding of state of the art knowledge in the field and to examine how such knowledge is and can be produced. In so doing, the course consistently combines and integrates theoretical and methodological queries.
The course’s underlying pedagogical philosophy is that the generic intellectual skills of critical thinking and independent analysis are best developed in delimited thematic contexts, in which the connection between knowledge about (findings and theories) and knowledge how (methodology) are most visible and open for scrutiny. To this end, the course is focused on key problems and questions in contemporary IMER research, and benefits from the expertise and current research in the department. Apart from offering students in-depth knowledge on a selected set of subjects in the IMER field, it also develops a more profound and general understanding of what it means “to know” something and how such knowledge is produced in the social sciences.

Contents

Each module consists of one general and one specific part. The first part introduces the field, key concepts and theories, important findings and main controversies through a series of lectures and seminars with fixed content/readings. The second part consists of individual work on a more specific topic within the wider area, in which students in dialogue with the teacher(s) select and review a particular research field. The reviewed material can be either secondary or primary. Teaching in the second part is organized as a series of supervision workshops where students and teacher(s) meet and discuss selection and assessment of their respective research fields.
Every autumn two of the following modules will be available for students. The two modules will be offered in succession. Two months before the course starts the two modules will be announced. Each module consists of approximately 1,000 pages of compulsory reading plus an additional 1,000 pages or the equivalent of readings/material selected in agreement with the teacher/s.
The four modules are:

  • Populism and Democracy: Party Politics and Beyond
  • Race and Ethnicity
  • Studying Migration and Im/mobility through Qualitative Research
  • Norms and Values in International Migration

Populism and Democrac: Part Politics and Beyond, 15 credits

Contents

THIS MODULE IS NOT OFFERED IN AUTUMN 2019
The module focuses firstly on populism as a societal phenomenon with the key question being the relation between populism and democracy, and secondly it will scrutinize the so-called Populist Radical Right Parties in relation to their national contexts.

Race and Ethnicity, 15 credits

Contents

The emphasis in this course is on developing a general theoretical understanding of what race and ethnicity means. Through lectures, discussions and watching documentary films, theories of race and ethnicity are related to examples in order to deepen the understanding of race and ethnicity in the contemporary world.

Migration and Im/mobility through Qualitative Reseach, 15 credits

Contents

THIS MODULE IS NOT OFFERED IN AUTUMN 2019
The module focuses on how migration and mobility impact on individuals’ lives, and how to conduct research that places mobility at its core. The main focus is on the micro level and the lived experiences which are accessed through the narratives of migrants.

Norms and Values in International Migration, 15 credits

Contents

International migration is a field of conflicting goals and realities. This module examines the role and meaning of norms and values in this field from both empirical and normative perspectives, drawing on contemporary research and theories in political theory, anthropology and sociology.

Grading system

Excellent (A), Very Good (B), Good (C), Satisfactory (D), Pass (E) or Fail (U).

Reading list and other media

Each module consists of approximately 1,000 pages of compulsory reading plus an additional 1,000 pages or the equivalent of readings/material selected in agreement with the teacher/s.

Race and Ethnicity

  • Cornell, S. and Hartmann, D. 2007. Ethnicity and Race: Making Identities in a Changing World. Pine Forge Press (336 pages).
  • Daynes, S. and Lee, O. 2008. Desire for Race. Cambridge University Press (256 pages).
  • Song, M. 2003. Choosing Ethnic Identity. Polity Press (192 pages).
  • Murji, K and Solomos, J (eds). 2014. Theories of race and ethnicity: contemporary debates and perspectives, Cambridge University press, (308 pages).

Norms and Values in International Migration

  • Adey, Peter, Bissell, David, Hannam, Kevin, Merriman, Peter, and Sheller, Mimi (2017) The Routledge Handbook of Mobilities. New York, London: Routledge.
  • Carens, Joseph (2013) The Ethics of Immigration. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Fine, Sarah and Ypi, Lea (eds.) (2016) Migration in Political Theory. The Ethics of Movement and Membership. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Graeber, David (2001) Toward an Anthropological Theory of Value. The False Coin of Our Own Dreams. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Miller, David (2016) Strangers in Our Midst. The Political Philosophy of Immigration. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.
  • Sykes, Karen (ed.) (2009) Ethnographies of moral reasoning: Living paradoxes of a global age. New York: Palgrave (chapter 1).

Course evaluation

The University provides students who participate in or who have completed a course with the opportunity to make known their experiences and viewpoints with regards to the course by completing a course evaluation administered by the University. The University will compile and summarize the results of course evaluations as well as informing participants of the results and any decisions relating to measures initiated in response to the course evaluations. The results will be made available to the students (HF 1:14).

Interim rules

If a course is no longer offered or has undergone major changes, students will be offered a minimum of two re-take sessions based on the syllabus in force at registration during a period of one year from the date of the implementation of the changes.

Contact

The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department Department of Global Political Studies.

Further information

GPSstudent - Malmö universitet,
Anne Sofie Roald, Course Coordinator
Phone: 040-6657639

Application

02 September 2019 - 19 January 2020 Day-time 100% Malmö Application code: mau-91780

National application round

Tuition fees

for non-EU students only

First instalment: 38000 SEK
Full tuition Fee: 38000 SEK

Open for late application

Apply

31 August 2020 - 17 January 2021 Day-time 100% Malmö