Theorizing Media Technology

Summary

Admission requirements

  1. Degree of bachelor in Media Technology or in a related field. Examples of relevant degrees include, but are not limited to: computer science, informatics, information systems, human-computer interaction, interaction design, media/IT management, game development, media and communication studies, and digital cultural studies. All degrees must be equivalent to at least 180 higher education credits.
  2. The equivalent of English 6/English B in Swedish secondary school.

Syllabus

Syllabus for students autumn 2018, autumn 2017

Course Code:
ME610A revision 1.1
Swedish name:
Teoretisera medieteknik
Level of specialisation
A1N
Main fields of study:
Media Technology
Language:
English
Date of ratification:
03 July 2017
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Technology and Society
Enforcement date:
28 August 2017
Replaces Syllabus ratified:
15 November 2016

Entry requirements

  1. Degree of bachelor in Media Technology or in a related field. Examples of relevant degrees include, but are not limited to: computer science, informatics, information systems, human-computer interaction, interaction design, media/IT management, game development, media and communication studies, and digital cultural studies. All degrees must be equivalent to at least 180 higher education credits.
  2. The equivalent of English 6/English B in Swedish secondary school.

Specialisation and progression relative to the degree regulations

The course meets the degree requirement for the degree of Master (One Year), main field of study Media Technology.

Purpose

The course objective is for the student to develop and apply advanced theoretical knowledge in the field of media technology, and be able to put this in relation to existing and emerging media technologies and their impact on the media industry, as well as to relevant social, economic and cultural aspects and conditions.

Contents

The course contains the following elements:

  • Interdisciplinary perspectives on theory of media development, focusing on the emergence and diffusion of media technologies
  • Social, economic and cultural contextualization of media development and use
  • The media industry's structure, goals and business ideas
  • Practical application of theory in business-related cases

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding
On completion of the course the student shall demonstrate ability to:

  • Explain how media technologies can create value for media companies and the society
  • Explain the interactions and relationships between theories related to media development, as well as their practical applications
  • Explain how different social, economic and cultural factors affect media development and use
Skills and abilities
On completion of the course the student shall demonstrate ability to:
  • Analyse and discuss media technology development from different perspectives and contexts
  • Apply theory and practice to explain how various factors promote and hinder the creation and dissemination of innovations in media technology
  • Assimilate theoretical knowledge and in groups present and discuss literature, case studies and research articles
  • In writing be able to communicate results of one’s own work
Judgement and approach
On completion of the course the student shall demonstrate ability to:
  • Apply theoretical knowledge into practical action for complex media-technological situations
  • Demonstrate an advanced understanding of the theoretical foundations of media technology and its social contexts apply the theoretical knowledge into practical action for complex media-technological situations
  • Motivate and evaluate different viewpoints on media development and argue from different perspectives and needs

Learning activities

Lectures, seminars, and independent studies, individually and in groups.

Discussion seminars and assignments are supplemented with lectures, guest lectures and student-driven lectures.


The course requires active participation of the student. The student is expected to participate in discussions through experiences, reflections, interpretations and perspectives. Students are expected to take initiative to response work and meetings of various kinds, and be well prepared for seminars. Peer assessments are included in the teaching.

Assessments

The course is examined through oral and written examination, including active participation in seminars.

The course is assessed through the following:

  • Written examination (5 credits)
  • Seminars (2.5 credits)
To pass the course at least grade G on each part is required. To obtain VG for the entire course, VG is required on the written examination.

Grading system

Fail (U), Pass (G) or Pass with Distinction (VG).

Course literature and other teaching materials


Recommended literature
  • Dijck, José van (2013). The culture of connectivity: a critical history of social media. New York: Oxford University Press
  • Fuchs, Christian (2014). Social media: a critical introduction. London: SAGE Publications
  • Pink, Sarah, Ardévol, Elisenda & Lanzeni, Débora (red.) (2016). Digital materialities: design and anthropology. London: Bloomsbury Academic
  • Schäfer, Mirko Tobias & Van Es, Karin (red.) (2017). The datafied society: studying culture through data. Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press (Available as open access: http://oapen.org/search?identifier=624771)

In addition, there will be a required reading of a number of journal articles.

Reference literature
  • Aris, Annet (2009). Managing media companies: harnessing creative values. 2. ed. Chichester: Wiley
  • Bauer, Johannes M. & Latzer, Michael (red.) (2016). Handbook on the economics of the internet.
  • Bolter, Jay David & Grusin, Richard (1999). Remediation: understanding new media. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press
  • Christensen, Clayton M. (1997). The innovator's dilemma: when new technologies cause great firms to fail. Boston, Mass.: Harvard Business School
  • Lindgren, Simon (2017). Digital media & society. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications
  • Löwgren, Jonas & Reimer, Bo (2013). Collaborative media: production, consumption, and design interventions. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press
  • Picard, Robert G. & Wildman, Steven S. (eds) (2016). Handbook on the Economics of the Media. Edward Elgar Pub.
  • Rogers, Everett M. (2005). Diffusion of innovations. 5. ed. New York: Free press
  • Shapiro, Carl & Varian, Hal R (1999). Information rules: a strategic guide to the network economy. Boston, Mass.: Harvard Business School

Course evaluation

The university provides all students who are participating in, or have completed, a course to express their experiences and views on the course through a course evaluation which is organized at the end of the course. The university will collate the course evaluations and provide information about their results and any actions prompted by them. The results shall be made available to the students. (HF 1:14).

Interim rules

When a course is no longer given, or the contents have been radically changed, the student has the right to re-take the examination, which will be given twice during a one year period, according to the syllabus which was valid at the time of registration.

Contact

The education is provided by the Faculty of Technology and Society at the department Computer Science and Media Technology.

Further information

Samuel Andersson, Student Services Assistant
Phone: 040-6657759
Martin Berg, Course Responsible

Application

03 September 2018 - 07 October 2018 Day-time 100% Malmö This course is offered as part of a program