Media Technology: Master's (One Year) Thesis

Summary

Admission requirements

  1. Degree of bachelor in Media Technology or in a related field. Examples of relevant degrees include, but are not limited to: computer science, informatics, information systems, human-computer interaction, interaction design, media/IT management, game development, media and communication studies, and digital cultural studies. All degrees must be equivalent to at least 180 higher education credits.
  2. The equivalent of English 6/English B in Swedish secondary school.
  3. Passed at least 15 credits in the programme Media Technology: Strategic Media Development, Master’s Programme (One Year).

Syllabus

Syllabus for students spring 2019, spring 2018

Course Code:
ME620A revision 1
Swedish name:
Medieteknik: Examensarbete (magister)
Level of specialisation
A1E
Main fields of study:
Media Technology
Language:
English
Date of ratification:
15 November 2016
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Technology and Society
Enforcement date:
15 January 2018

Entry requirements

  1. Degree of bachelor in Media Technology or in a related field. Examples of relevant degrees include, but are not limited to: computer science, informatics, information systems, human-computer interaction, interaction design, media/IT management, game development, media and communication studies, and digital cultural studies. All degrees must be equivalent to at least 180 higher education credits.
  2. The equivalent of English 6/English B in Swedish secondary school.
  3. Passed at least 15 credits in the programme Media Technology: Strategic Media Development, Master’s Programme (One Year).

Specialisation and progression relative to the degree regulations

The course meets the degree requirement for the degree of Master (One Year), main field of study Media Technology.

Purpose

The purpose of the course is for students to develop the knowledge, understanding and skills needed to work independently with advanced projects within the area of media technology. The work for the thesis will be conducted in a scientific way in the exploration of problems in the field of media technology.

Contents

The thesis work should concern an interesting and relevant problem in the field of media technology. The thesis aims to verify questions from the field in relation to relevant methods and theories, through investigation and analysis of a media technological problem. The work will result in an academic report, supplemented by a configurative prototype, model or similar. The thesis work should be presented orally and in writing. The work also includes critically examining own and other student’s works, in relation to scientific, social and ethical aspects.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding
On completion of the course the student shall demonstrate ability to:

  • show thorough knowledge and understanding of relevant scientific and practical knowledge in the chosen subject within media technology
  • show in-depth knowledge of the research process, its planning and its implementation
Skills and abilities
On completion of the course the student shall demonstrate ability to:
  • from a holistic perspective, critically, independently and creatively identify, formulate and handle complex questions
  • plan and with scientific methods carry out tasks in a given time frame, and be able to motivate and reflect on one’s own choices
  • construct innovative solutions to media-technical issues and present them in an academic paper, supplemented by a configurative prototype, model or similar
  • orally and in writing, in accordance with established standards, clearly describe and critically discuss processes and conclusions, the knowledge and the arguments underpinning these, in one’s own and others’ investigative work, and in dialogue with different groups
  • present the study in different contexts in relation to different groups and through various forms of communication and forums
Judgement and approach
On completion of the course the student shall demonstrate ability to:
  • critically and systematically integrate knowledge, and analyse, assess and deal with complex issues and situations, during given time frames
  • evaluate and assess a scientific work taking into account relevant scientific, social and ethical aspects
  • identify the need of further knowledge and take responsibility for one’s own continued knowledge development

Learning activities

The course consists of independent work, supervision and seminars/workshops.

The course predominately consists of the independent work of the student. The student participates in the knowledge experiences by actively contributing his/her own experiences, reflections, interpretations and perspectives. The student is expected to take initiative to supervising sessions and workshops of various kinds. The thesis work is done individually. The work shall be completed within agreed timeframes. It is the student's task to propose an appropriate task for the thesis.

During the course the student has the right to supervision. At the beginning of the course work, an academic supervisor is assigned to the student, who may also have an external supervisor, for example at a company that he work is done in collaboration with. The supervisor supports and guides the student, but the student must be proactive in requesting supervision. The student is expected to report to the supervisor continuously during the thesis work.

Assessments

The course is passed through the following:

  • Passed project plan including a time plan (3 credits)
  • Passed prototype (5 credits)
  • Passed report (15 hp)
  • Passed seminars (3 credits)
  • Passed oral presentation including presentation/publishing at alterative forum (3 credits)
  • Passed opposition (1 credit)
To pass the course, at least the grade G is required on each part. To obtain a VG for the entire course, the grade VG is required for the report and prototype.

Grading system

Fail (U), Pass (G) or Pass with Distinction (VG).

Course literature and other teaching materials

The course has no specific recommended literature, but is determined individually by the student in discussion with the supervisor.
//Reference literature://
  • Alvesson, M. (2010). Interpreting interviews. London. Sage Publications.
  • Berndtsson, M., Hansson, J., Olsson, B., & Lundell, B. (2008). Thesis projects: A guide for students in computer science and information systems. (2008). London: Springer.
  • Björk, L., Räisänen, C. & Björk C. M. (2003). Academic writing: A university writing course. 3 ed. Lund: Stuentlitteratur.
  • Christensen, L. B. (2007). Experimental methodology. 10 ed., Oxford: Pearson/Allyn & Bacon.
  • Cox, B. G., Binder, D. A., Chinnappa, B. N., Christianson, A., & Colledge, M. J. (2011). Business survey methods. Toronto: Wiley.
  • Fowler, F. J. J. (2002). Survey research methods. London: Sage publications.
  • Cresswell, J. W. (2008) Research design: Qualitativ, quantitative and mixed methods approaches. London: Sage Publications.
  • Gillham, B. (2008). Observation techniques: Structured to unstructured. London: Continuum International Pub.
  • Groves, R. M. (2010). Survey Methodology. New York: Wiley
  • Hammersley, M. (2010). Methodology. London: Sage publications.
  • Kothari, C. R. (2004). Research methodology: methods & techniques. New Delhi: New Age International Publishers.
  • Kumar, R. (2011) Research methodology: a step-by-step guide for beginners. 3 ed. New Delhi: New Age International Publishers.
  • Kvale, S. (2009). Interviews: Learning the craft of qualitative research interviewing. London: Sage Publications.
  • Ladyman, J. (2002). Understanding philosophy of science. New York: Routledge.
  • Lange, M. (2007). Philosophy of science: An anthology. Oxford: Blackwell Publication.
  • Malmfors, B. (2004). Writing and presenting scientific papers. Notttingham: Nottingham University Press.
  • Neuendorf, K. A. (2002). The content analysis: Guidebook. London: Sage Publications.
  • Ridely, D. (2008). The literature review: a step-by-step guide for students, London: Sage Publication.
  • Rosenberg, A. (2005). Philosophy of science: A contemporary introduction. New York: Routledge.
  • Sapsford, R. (2007). Survey research. London: Sage Publications.
  • Simonsen, J. & Robertson, T. (2013). Routledge international handbook of participatory design. New York: Routledge.
  • Stake, R. E. (1995). The Art of Case Study Research. London: Sage publications.
  • Thomas, R. M. (2003). Blending qualitative and quantitative research methods in theses and dissertations. London: Sage Publications.
  • Yin, R.K. (2013). Case study research: Design and methods, 5 ed. London: Sage publications.

Course evaluation

The University provides all students who are participating in, or have completed, a course to express their experiences and views on the course through a course evaluation which is organized at the end of the course. The university will collate the course evaluations and provide information about their results and any actions prompted by them. The results shall be made available to the students. (HF 1:14).

Interim rules

When a course is no longer given, or the contents have been radically changed, the student has the right to re-take the examination, which will be given twice during a one year period, according to the syllabus which was valid at the time of registration.

Contact

The education is provided by the Faculty of Technology and Society at the department Computer Science and Media Technology.

Further information

Bodil Sterner, Student Services Assistant
Phone: 040-6657620
Maria Engberg, Course Responsible
Phone: 040-6657328

Application

21 January 2019 - 09 June 2019 Day-time 100% Malmö This course is offered as part of a program

15 January 2018 - 03 June 2018 Day-time 100% Malmö Schedule This course is offered as part of a program

Tuition fees

for non-EU students only

First instalment: 62000 SEK
Full tuition Fee: 62000 SEK