Prototyping Media Technology

Summary

This course introduces students to the theories and methods of design and prototyping for media technology.

Admission requirements

  1. Bachelor degree in media technology or in a related field with a minimum 180 European Credit Transfer System credits. Examples of related fields include: computer science, informatics, information systems, human-computer interaction, interaction design, media/IT management, game development, media and communication science and digital cultural studies.
  2. English proficiency equivalent to English 6 from a Swedish upper secondary school.

Selection:

credits 100%

Syllabus

Syllabus for students autumn 2020

Course Code:
ME652E revision 1
Swedish name:
Prototyputveckling inom medieteknik
Level of specialisation
A1N
Main fields of study:
Media Technology
Language:
English
Date of ratification:
25 March 2019
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Technology and Society
Enforcement date:
31 August 2020

Entry requirements

  1. Bachelor degree in media technology or in a related field with a minimum 180 European Credit Transfer System credits. Examples of related fields include: computer science, informatics, information systems, human-computer interaction, interaction design, media/IT management, game development, media and communication science and digital cultural studies.
  2. English proficiency equivalent to English 6 from a Swedish upper secondary school.

Specialisation and progression relative to the degree regulations

The course is part of the main area of study media technology and can be included in the degree requirements for a Degree of Master of Science in Media Technology (120 credits).

Purpose

This course introduces students to the theories and methods of design and prototyping for media technology.

Contents

  • Design theory and processes,
  • Idea generation and concept development techniques,
  • Sketching and prototype development of software, hardware, digital services and organisational processes,
  • Testing and evaluation,
  • Analyses of user and market needs.

Learning outcomes

Knowledge and understanding
By the end of the course students should be able to:

  • explain the role of prototype development in relation to technology, user and business needs,
  • discuss how design and prototyping can create value for different stakeholders,
  • demonstrate understanding of design theory and design processes in prototyping.
Competence and abilities
By the end of the course students should be able to:
  • apply appropriate prototyping tools and methods in different stages of design and development,
  • create and develop concepts,
  • build prototypes of various types,
  • test and evaluate prototypes with users,
  • manage design and prototype development processes,
  • communicate innovations in different contexts.
Evaluation abilities and approach
By the end of the course students should be able to:
  • combine knowledge about technology, users and business needs and translate these into design practice,
  • choose and justify sustainable prototype development approaches for specific situations,
  • assess value creation through design and prototype development.

Learning activities

The course consists of lectures, workshops and project work.

Assessments

Grading is based on oral and written examination, including prototyping project.
The course is assessed based on the following:

  • Written examination (2 credits, UA)
  • Assignments (3 credits, UA)
  • Project (2.5 credits, UA)
To pass the course (A-E): Passing grade on all parts above is required. Course grade is calculated based on the weighted average of assessed parts.

Grading system

Excellent (A), Very Good (B), Good (C), Satisfactory (D), Pass (E) or Fail (U).

Course literature and other teaching materials

  • Brown, T. (2009). Change by design. New York: Harper Collins.
  • Buxton, B. (2007). Sketching user experiences. Oxford, UK: Elsevier.
  • Goodwin, K. (2009). Designing for the digital age: How to create human-centered products and services. New York: Wiley.
  • Kumar, V (2013). 101 Design methods. New York: John Wiley.
  • Muratovski, G. (2016). Research for designers: A guide to methods and practice. London: Sage.
  • Valentine, L. (2013). Prototype: Design and craft in the 21st century. London: Bloomsbury.
There will be additional readings.

Course evaluation

The University provides students who are taking or have completed a course with the opportunity to share their experiences of and opinions about the course in the form of a course evaluation that is arranged by the University. The University compiles the course evaluations and notifies the results and any decisions regarding actions brought about by the course evaluations. The results shall be kept available for the students. (HF 1:14).

Interim rules

When a course is no longer given, or the contents have been radically changed, the student has the right to re-take the examination, which will be given twice during a one year period, according to the syllabus which was valid at the time of registration.

Other Information

The syllabus is a translation of a Swedish source text.

Contact

The education is provided by the Faculty of Technology and Society at the Department of Computer Science and Media Technology.

Further information

Application

09 November 2020 - 13 December 2020 Day-time 100% Malmö This course is offered as part of a program

Tuition fees

for non-EU students only

First instalment: 15000 SEK
Full tuition Fee: 15000 SEK

09 November 2020 - 13 December 2020 Day-time 100% Malmö Application code: mau-08341

National application round

Tuition fees

for non-EU students only

First instalment: 15000 SEK
Full tuition Fee: 15000 SEK

Open for late application

Apply