Human Rights II

Summary

The aim of the course is to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the field of Human Rights, in terms of both theory and methodology. Students will also acquire an ability to analyse central questions and problems within the field in an independent and critical manner. This is primarily achieved through project work

Admission requirements

Prerequisite courses for this course are: Passed courses: MR101L-Human Rights I.

Selection:

credits 100%

Syllabus

Syllabus for students spring 2019, spring 2018, spring 2017

Course Code:
MR105L revision 5.2
Level of specialisation
G1F
Main fields of study:
Human Rights
Language:
English
Date of ratification:
15 November 2016
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Culture and Society
Enforcement date:
16 January 2017
Replaces Syllabus ratified:
02 November 2016

Entry requirements

Prerequisite courses for this course are: Passed courses: MR101L-Human Rights I.

Purpose

The aim of the course is to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the field of Human Rights, in terms of both theory and methodology. Students will also acquire an ability to analyse central questions and problems within the field in an independent and critical manner. This is primarily achieved through project work.

Contents

  • The course consists of four modules:1. Politics and HR II (7.5 credits)The first module (politics and HR II) relates to the study of modern theories of society and their importance for the analysis of human rights. 2. Philosophy, religion and HR II (7,5 credits)The second module (philosophy, religion and HR II) deals with the debate between universalism and multiculturalism in the concept and understanding of human rights3. Law and HR II (7.5 credits)The third module (law and HR II) addresses the function of regional legal systems and their relation to the UN system for the legal protection of human rights.4. Method and project work (7.5 credits)The fourth module (method and project work) comprises of a project work and integrated method aiming to give knowledge, understanding and abilities relevant for writing of a thesis, and for the analysis of human rights in general. The method teaching is carried out as an integrated part of the project work and runs parallel to the process of the essay.

Learning outcomes

Human rights II consists of four modules of 7,5 credits each, with the following learning outcomes:

Module 1: Politics and human rights II

After finishing the course the student:

  1. can demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the political perspectives of human rights, especially modern theories in society and their importance for the analysis of human rights;
  2. can demonstrate, within given time frames, an ability to identify, formulate, and solve questions and problematizations based on applying modern theories in society and their importance for the analysis of human rights.
  3. can demonstrate an in-depth ability to analyse, interpret the development of and critically reflect over modern theories in society and their importance for the analysis of human rights.

Module 2: Philosophy, religion and human rights II

After finishing the course the student:
  1. can demonstrate knowledge and understanding of perspectives involving philosophy and religion in relation to human rights, especially concerning issues about women's rights and human development, multiculturalism, and freedom of religion in secular states.
  2. can demonstrate, within given time frames, an ability to identify, formulate, and solve questions and problematizations based on applying theories within philosophy and religion on matters pertaining to human rights.
  3. can demonstrate, in relation to human rights, an in-depth ability to analyze, interpret the development of, and critically reflect on issues concerning women's rights and human development, multiculturalism, and freedom of religion in secular states.

Module 3: Law and human rights II

After finishing the course, the student:
  1. can demonstrate knowledge and understanding, based on the legal perspective of human rights and an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the international legal system for the protection of human rights and its connection to regional human rights systems.
  2. can demonstrate an in-depth ability to analyse, interpret the development of, and critically evaluate the global system of human rights and how it connects to the human rights context of regional systems;
  3. can demonstrate, an ability from a legal perspective, to identify, formulate, and solve questions and problematizations based on applying regional human rights systems;
  4. can demonstrate an ability to in writing give a critical legal account of their assessment and analysis of these problems and tasks

Module 4: Method and project work

After finishing the course, the student:
  1. can demonstrate knowledge and understanding of legal, social scientific and philosophical methods-
  2. can demonstrate an ability,as part of a group, to collect and revise material on human rights that is relevant to the topics covered by the modules, and can give a logical and coherent account of this material and information.
  3. be able to organize an academic text as well as be able to use academic formalities and on a basic level master an academic language
  4. have the ablity to assess and defend a project work

Learning activities

The course is designed for full-time study. The teaching in each module is mainly lectures and seminars. The majority of the student’s workload consists of independent study. During the project work, teachers supervision as well as methodology teaching is provided. The learning activities presuppose active participation from the students. Module 3 Law and Human Rights II and module 4 Method and Project Work run parallel. Tutorials and seminars of the method module are mandatory. Students who have not presented a passing project work cannot be guaranteed further supervision.

Assessments

1. Politics and human rights II
Learning outcomes 1-3 are assessed by means of a take home exam.
2. Philosophy, religion and human rights II
Learning outcomes 1-3 are assessed by means of a take home exam.
3.Law and human rights II
Learning outcomes 1-4 are assessed by means of a class room exam.
Module 4: Method and Project Work
Learning outcomes 1-4 are assessed by means of writing, evaluating and defending a project work in a group.

In order to achieve a passing grade on the course in its entirety, the grade Pass is required for each examination.

Grading system

Excellent (A), Very Good (B), Good (C), Satisfactory (D), Pass (E) or Fail (U).

Course literature and other teaching materials


Module 1: Politics and HR II
  • Jones, Pip, Liz Bradbury & Shaun LeBoutillier (2015) Introducing Social Theory, 2nd Edition. Polity Press.

There may be additional articles (max 300 pages) in lecture presentations

Module 2: Philosophy, religion and HR II
  • Charusheela, S.:”Social analysis and the capabilities approach: a limit to Martha Nussbaum’s universalist ethics”, Cambridge Journal of Economics, 2008, pp. 1-18.
  • Kymlicka, Will (1995) Multicultural citizenship (Oxford: Oxford University Press).
  • Okin, Susan Moller: Is Multiculturalism Bad for Women?, Princeton: Princeton Univ. Press 1999 (excerpt, about 30 p.)
  • Nussbaum, Martha (2000) Women and human development (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press).
  • Skerker, Michael: "Nussbaum's Capabilities Approach and Religion", The Journal of Religion, Vol. 84, No. 3 (July 2004), pp. 379-409
  • Trigg, Roger (2012): “Equality, freedom and religion”, Oxford Univ. Press.

There may be additional articles (max 100 pages) in lecture presentations

Module 3: Law and HR II
  • Cameron Iain (2010) Introduction to the European Convention on Human Rights (Uppsala: Iustus förlag).
  • Smith, Rhona (latest ed.), Textbook on International Human Rights (Oxford: Oxford UP)

There may be additional articles (max 300 pages) in lecture presentations.

Module 4: Method and project work
  • Landman, Todd (2002) Comparative Politics and Human Rights Human Rights Quarterly, 24 (4): 890-923.
  • May, Tim (2001), Social Science Research (London: Open University).
  • Shelton, Dinah (2006) Normative Hierarchy in International Law The American Journal of International Law, vol 100, no 2: 291-323.
  • Strong, S.I, (2014) How to write Law Essays and Exams, Oxford UP
  • Thomson, Anne (1999) Critical reasoning in ethics: a practical introduction, London: Routledge
  • Walliman, Nicholas (2010), Research methods: The basics (Taylor and Francis)
  • Weston, Anthony (2009) Rulebook for Arguments. Hackett Publishing.

Recommended additional reading: Warburton, Nigel (2000) Thinking From A to Z (London: Routledge).

There may be additional articles (max 300 pages) in lecture presentations.

Course evaluation

The University provides students who participate in or who have completed a course with the opportunity to make known their experiences and viewpoints with regards to the course by completing a course evaluation administered by the University. The University will compile and summarize the results of course evaluations as well as informing participants of the results and any decisions relating to measures initiated in response to the course evaluations. The results will be made available to the students (HF 1:14).

Interim rules

If a course is no longer offered or has undergone major changes, students will be offered two re-take sessions based on the syllabus in force at registration during a period of one year from the date of the implementation of the changes.

Other Information

The Language of Instruction is English

Contact

The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department Department of Global Political Studies.

Further information

Malin Isaksson, Course Responsible
Phone: 040-6657282

Application

15 January 2018 - 03 June 2018 Day-time 100% Malmö Schedule

Tuition fees

for non-EU students only

First instalment: 41000 SEK
Full tuition Fee: 41000 SEK

21 January 2019 - 02 June 2019 Day-time 100% Malmö Application period for this offer starts 17 September 2018.