Social Entrepreneurship in Theory and Practice

This course is not offered.

Please see http://edu.mau.se/en/ for our current offerings.
If you have questions about this course, please contact the department, see Contact.

 

Summary

The aim of this course is that students should develop an understanding of the field of Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation, which is rapidly garnering attention around the world from policy makers, organizations and others. As the traditional lines blur between nonprofit enterprises, public services and business, it is critical that students understands the opportunities and challenges in this new landscape.

Admission requirements

Bachelor degree, consisting of 180 Higher education credits. English course B in Swedish secondary school.

Selection:

credits 100%

Syllabus

Syllabus for students spring 2012

Course Code:
OL620A revision 1.1
Level of specialisation
A1N
Main fields of study:
Leadership and Organization
Language:
English
Date of establishment:
19 May 2011
Date of ratification:
26 October 2011
Decision-making body:
Faculty of Culture and Society
Enforcement date:
16 January 2012
Replaces Syllabus ratified:
30 May 2011

Course description

The aim of this course is that students should develop understanding as well as practical skills within the field of Social Entrepreneurship, which is rapidly garnering attention around the world from policy makers, organisations and others. As the traditional lines blur between nonprofit enterprises, public services and business, it is critical that students understand the opportunities and challenges in this new landscape. The course provides students with an orientation in this developing landscape as well as knowledge and skills to lead organisational development in practice, by reflecting on a project that the students plan and execute themselves. The course is open to students from various backgrounds seeking to develop skills in leadership and organisation within the field of Social Entrepreneurship.

Advancement in relation to the degree requirements

This course is included in the main area Leadership and organisation at advanced level of 91-120 credits.

Entry requirements

Bachelor degree, consisting of 180 Higher education credits. English course B in Swedish secondary school.

Learning outcomes

Applying knowledge and understanding
Upon completion of this course students will:

  • demonstrate a critical understanding of the research on, and practice of, social entrepreneurship and its development in a global context
  • demonstrate a critical understanding of perspectives and tools for approaching the challenges of organisational development within the field of social entrepreneurship

Skills and abilities
Upon completion of this course students will be able to:
  • discuss and relate to discourse and policy on social entrepreneurship and innovation
  • make informed decisions on choice of management models, strategies of communication and in handling a project or organisation’s relation to its context
  • use a number of different models and techniques for broad stakeholder involvement including new forms of interactive media
  • develop, execute and evalute a project within the field of social entrepreneurship

Judgement and approach
Upon completion of this course students will be able to:
  • critically reflect on the social entrepreneur as a change agent
  • discuss basic values underpinning social entrepreneurship and sustainable development
  • identify and assess ethical issues in balancing the interests of different stakeholders with an end toward creating sustainable development

Assessments

Forms of examination include:
Module 1: Social Entrepreneurship in Theory and Practice (15 credits)

  • Written report on group work (6 credits). This includes presenting the findings at a seminar. Grade: fail/pass/pass with distinction
  • Individual report (9 credits). Grade: fail/pass/pass with distinction

Module 2: Project work (15 credits)
  • Project report (15 credits). Grade: fail/pass/with distinction. This includes presenting the project at an open seminar.

A passing grade (G) is achieved by successfully completing each component of the course. To pass with distinction (VG) on the course as a whole, the student must in addition pass with distinction for at least 21 credits. To pass with distinction, the student must demonstrate excellent ability to independently collect and interpret data and communicate findings, ideas and solutions.

Course content

The course is divided into two modules: Social Entrepreneurship in Theory and Practice and Project work, each consisting of 15 credits.

Module 1, Social Entrepreneurship in Theory and Practice, covers the following topics:

  • Research and policy on Social Entrepreneurship, Social Innovation and related concepts
  • Sustainable development, especially in urban and global contexts
  • Leadership and organisation in Social Entrepreneurial organisations and partnerships: Management, strategy and communication
  • Network and support structures
  • Resource based theory and social capital
  • Citizenship, community and Social Entrepreneurship

Module 2, Project work, consists of planning and executing a project. Here students, in pairs, can focus on an issue where they have a special interest in within the field of Social Entrepreneurship. The projects should be developed and executed in collaboration with stakeholders outside of the school.

Learning activities

Teaching methods include lectures, field trips, seminars, case studies and project work.

50 hours of lectures/seminars of which approximately 10 hours are mandatory, field trips/guest lectures 20 hours, project supervision 10 hours, group work approximately 70 hours, individual work approximately 250 hours, project work 400 hours.

Grading system

Fail (U), Pass (G) or Pass with Distinction (VG).

Course literature and other teaching materials

Books
  • Andersen, E.S., Wiig, R., Grude, K.V. & Haug, T. (2009). Goal directed project management. Kogan Page, London.
  • Gunn, R. & Durkin, C. (2010). Social Entrepreneurship. A Skills approach. Policy Press, Bristol.
  • Henriques, A. & Richardson, J. (ed). (2004). The triple bottom line, does it all add up? Assessing the sustainability of business and CSR. Earthscan, London.
  • Light, P. L. (2008). The Search for Social Entrepreneurship. Brookings Institution Press, Washington.
  • MacCallum, D., Moulaert, F., Hillier, J. & Vicari Haddock, S. (ed). (2009). Social innovation and territorial development. Ashgate, Farnham.
  • Steyaert, C. & Hjort, D. (ed.). (2006). Entrepreneurship as Social Change. Edward Elgar Publishing Limited, Cheltenham.


Articles:
  • Austin et al. ”Social and commercial entrepreneurship: Same, different or both?”, Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, January 2006.
  • Cook, B, Dodds, Ch & Mitchell, W. 2003: “Social Entrepreneurship – False premises and dangerous Forebodings”. Australian Journal Of Social Issues, Vol. 38 No. 1 (February 2003) p. 57-71.
  • Håkansson & Sjöholm. ”Who Do You Trust? Ethnicity and Trust in Bosnia and Herzegovina”, Europe-Asia Studies, 2007, 59:6, 961 - 976.
  • Lister, Ruth. ”Citizen in action: Citizenship and community development in a Northern Ireland context”, Community Dev. J.,July 1998:33, pp 226 - 235.
  • Mari & Martí. ”Social entrepreneurship research: A source of explanation, prediction, and delight.” Journal of World Business, 41: 2006, pp. 36-44.
  • Martin, Roger L & Osberg, Sally. ”Social entrepreneurship: the case of definition”, Stanford Social Innovation Review, Spring 2007.
  • Putnam, R.: Making democracy work. 1993.(Ch. 6).
  • Quibria, M.G. ”The Puzzle of Social Capital. A Critical Review”, Asian Development Review, 2003, vol. 20, no. 2, pp. 19-39.
  • Shaw, M., & Martin, I. “Community work, citizenship and democracy: re-making the connections.” Community Development Journal, 2000, 35:401 – 413.
  • Spector, B. “Business Responsibilities in a Divided World’: The Cold War Roots of the Corporate Social Responsibility Movement”. Enterprise Soc (2008) 9 (2): 314-336.
  • Steyaert, C & Katz, J. “Reclaiming the space of entrepreneurship in society: geographical, discursive and social, dimensions.” Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, 2004, 16(3): 179-196.

A compendium with case studies will be made available at the beginning of the course

Course evaluation

Each module in the course will be evaluated separately upon completion. This provides periodic feedback on course development. The course as a whole will also be evaluated on completion. A summary of results will be kept in archive.

Contact

The education is provided by the Faculty of Culture and Society at the department Department of Urban Studies.

Further information

Åse Falk, Student Administrator
Phone: 040-6658039
Fredrik Björk, Course Coordinator
Phone: 040-6657124